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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1929leba 



EX-LIBKI$ 




MILES S. KIEHNER 

Editor-in-CKief 



L. ARCHIE LUTZ 



Busi 
Mar 



THE QUITTAPAHILLA 

1929 

PUBLISHED BY 

THE JUNIOR CLASS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 




l/fal/l\A1 IVN 




Tne Class of ig2Q speaks for the 
wKole college of Lebanon Valley 
in dedicating this volume to — 

DR. PAUL A. W. WALLACE 

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH 

In him we all love and honor 
a sympathetic guide through 
the morningland of literature 

A noble man, an unselfish teacher, 

a devoted friend, a lover of 

man and God. 





DR. PAUL A. W. WALLACE, PhD. 
Professor of English 



FVRPN^vraz 



Hriis 1929 QuittapaKilla 

is our contribution to Lebanon Valley 
College. We do not wish it to be 
merely a record, but an inspiration. 
If it has in any way advanced those 
ideals for which our Alma Mater 
stands, we have accomplished 
our purpose. 





VVNIbNIi^ 



THE COLLEGE 

THE CLASSES 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

ACTIVITIES 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

ORGAMIZATIONS 

PUBLICATIONS 

ATHLETICS 





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ITHIN your shining depths, dear friend, 
Lie stories never told. 
Of Lovely maids and handsome youths 
Whose steps were brave and bold. 

Glide on, among the trees and hills 
With sound of joy and mirth; 

Flow on, 'tween banks of velvet green. 
Through glade, by grassy earth. 

When the long, long day is over, 
And shades of twilight fall. 

Fond memories come rushing 
In answer to my call. 

And they bring back all my troubles, 
Joys, sorrows, toil, and care, 

Of school days and the "Quittie", 
And all that I found there. 



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Here haunting recollections throni 

from bygone years, 
For every nook and corner 

holds a memory." 




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Page Fourteen 



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Pfl(7f Fifteen 




Yes, music is the Prophet's art 
Among the gifts that God hath sent, 
One of the most magnificent." 




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Pagf Sixteen 



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Page Seventeen 













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DR. GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D. 



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Page Eighteen 



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President's Message 




PPORTUNITIES for advancement in your life are 
many and varied. Those who see and take ad- 
vantage rise, move forward, accomplish, and are 
crowned victors. 

The college opens great doors and urges onward 
and upward all who choose to enter. Hardships, privations, 
difficulties are met and conquered. 

Increased opportunities mean increased responsibilities 
but success and happiness come to those only who are will- 
ing to pay the price. Will you be a winner? 

G. D. Gossard, President 



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I'ni/e Nineteen 




SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, Sc.D. 
Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1902; Graduate Student, John Hopkins University, 1902- 
03; M.S., L. V. C, 1903; Sc.D., L. V. C, 1925; Professor of Biological Science, L. V. C, 
1903; Land Zoologist, Bahama Expedition, Baltimore Geographical Sociecy, Summer 1904; 
Director, Collection of Eocene and Miocene Fossils for Vassar College, Summer 1908; 
Student Marine Biology, Bermuda, Summer 1909; Student Tropical Botanical Gardens, 
Jamaica, Summer 1910; Student Brooklyn Institute, Summer 1911. 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1906; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1914; Professor of 
Chemistry and Physics, L. V. C, 1907-09 ; Instructor in Analytical Chemistry, Columbia 
University, 1912-14; In Industrial Chemistry, 1914-21; Chief Chemist, Aetna Explosives 
Company; Chemical Director, British American Company; Director of Control Laboratory, 
The Barret Company; Professor of Chemistry, L. V. C, 1921. — 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A.M. 
Professor of History 
Graduate Cumberland Valley State Normal School, 1894; A.B., Ursinus College, 1899; 
A.M., Lebanon Valley College, 1900; Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin, 1904; In- 
structor of Political Science, Lebanon Valley College, 1899-1900; Professor of History and 
Political Science, 1900-16; Custodian of Public Records, Pennsylvania State Library, 
1916-23; State Archivist, 1923; Instructor in Y. M. C. A. Summer School; Blue Ridge, 
1916-20; Silver Bay, 1918; and Lake Geneva, 1921; Professor of History, Lebanon Valley 
College, 1920—, 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, A.M. 

Registrar and Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

Student, Millersville State Normal School, 1907; B.Ph., ibid., 1910; A.B., Lebanon 

Valley College, 1912; A.M., ibid., 1917; Student, Columbia University, 1914-16; Professor 

of Mathematics and Physics, Lebanon Valley College, 1915 — ; Registrar, Lebanon Valley 

College, 1921—. 



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ROBERT REUBEN BUTTERWICK, M.A., B.D., D.D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Bible 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1901; ibid., 1914; B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary, 
1905; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 1910; Twenty-six years in Ministry; Professor of 
Philosophy and Religion, Lebanon Valley College, 1912-22; Professor of Philosophy and 
Bible, ibid., 1922—. 



HAROLD BENNETT, Ph.D 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature 

B.A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915 ; Military Service with Canadian 
Expeditionary Forces, 1915-18; Fellow in Latin, University of Chicago, 1919-21; Professor 
of Latin, College of Charleston, Charleston, S. C, 1921-22 ; Professor of Latin Language 
and Literature, Lebanon Valley College, 1922 — . Travel and Study in Europe, 1926. 



ETHEL MAY BENNETT, B.A. 

Professor of French Literature and German 

B.A., Victoria College, University of Toronto ,1915 ; In charge of Modern Language, 
Ontario Ladies College, Whitby, Ont., 1915-19; Tutor in French and German, University 
of Chicago, 1920-21; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, summer, 1922; Professor of 
French Literature Lebanon Valley College, 1922 — ; Travel and Study in Europe, 1926. 

MARY CAPP GREEN 

Professor of French and Dean of Women 

Student, New York Conservatory of Music, 1896-97; Private teacher of Piano, 1897- 
1900; Travel and Study, Berlin, 1900-01; Paris, 1901-09; Florence, 1909-10; Johannesburg, 
1910-11; Paris 1911-14; Instructor in French, Lebanon Valley College, 1916-20; Study abroad, 
Ecole des Vacances, L'Alliance Francaise, Paris, 1923; Professor of French and Dean of 
Women, Lebancn Valley College 1920 — . 



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CHRISTIAN RISSER GINGRICH, LL.B. 
Professor of Political Science and Economics 
A.B.. Franklin and Marshall College, 1911; Principal of High School, 1911-13; LL.B., 
University of Pennsylvania Law School. 1916; Member of State and County Bar Associa- 
tions ; Professor of Political Science and Economics, Lebanon Valley College, 1916 — . 



PAUL ANTHONY WILSON WALLACE, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 
B.A., University of Toronto, 1915; In service with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 1915- 
18; M.A., University of Toronto, 1923; Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1925; Lecturer in Eng- 
lish, University of Alberta, 1919-22; Instructor in English University of Toronto, 1923-25; 
Professor of English, Lebanon Valley College, 1925 — . 



MARY KATHRYN WALLACE, A.M. 
Professor of English 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1923; Held Frances E. Bennett Scholarship in English 
at University of Pennsylvania, 1923-24; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1924; Instructor 
in English, Ohio Wesleyan University, 1924-25; Instructor in English and Director of Dram- 
atics, HoUins College, 1925-26; Professor of English, Lebanon Valley College, 1926 — . 



PAUL S. WAGNER, Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1917; Instructor in Mathematics, Lebanon Valley College, 
1917-18; Military Service, 1918-19; Headmaster Franklin Day School. Baltimore, Maryland, 
and Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1919-20; Graduate Student, Columbia Uni- 
versity, Summer Session, 1921 and 1923; Leave of Absence and Graduate Student, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1923-26; M.A.. ibid., 1925; Ph.D., ibid., 1926; Professor of Mathem- 
atics, Lebanon Valley College. 1926 — . 



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Ptit/e Tiventy-tzvo 



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G. ADOLPHUS RICHIE, A.M., D.D. 
Professor of Bible and New Tesfameni Greek 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1913; B.D., Bcnebrake Seminary, 1917; A.M., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1923; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 1927; Residence requirements Ph.D., 
completed University of Pennsylvania, 1927; Ten years in Ministry; Assistant, Marble 
Collegiate Church, N. Y., 1913-14; Professor of Bible and New Testament Greek, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1925—. 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, Ph.D. 
Professor of Education and Psychology 
Diploma, Illinois State Normal University, 1914; A.B., University of Illinois, 1916; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1917 ; Graduate Student, Leland Stanford University, Summer Quar- 
ter, 1920; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1927; Head, Department of Education and Psychol- 
ogy, College of Puget Sound, 1917-20; Professor of Phychology and Education, University 
of Rochester, 1920-23; Professor of Education and Psychology, Lebanon Valley College, 
1924—. 

MILTON LONSDALE STOKES. M.A., L.L.B. 
Professor of Business Administration 
B.A., University College, University of Toronto, 1920; Professor of English and History, 
Presbyterian College, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 1920-21; M.A., University of Toronto, 
1922 ; Summer Session in English and History at Queens University, Kingston, 1922 ; Lec- 
turer in Finance and Government, McMaster University, Toronto, 1922-23 ; Lecturer in 
Economics, Extension Department, University of Toronto, 1923-26 ; LL.B., University of 
Toronto, 1926; Barrister-at-Law degree, Osgoode Hall, Toronto, 1926; Member of the 
Bar, Province of Ontario. 

WILLIAM NORMAN MARTIN, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1918; Principal Lebanon Valley Academy, 1918-20; 
Science Department Research; Principal, Albert Academy, Sierra Leone, West Africa, 
1920-27; M.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; Student, Columbia University, 1923; Pro- 
fessor of Higher Mathematics, Fourah Bay College, 1924-26; Travel in Europe and Eng- 
land, 1920-23-26; Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, Lebanon Valley College, 1927 — . 



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RUTH ELIZABETH ENGLE, A.B. 

Director of Conservatory of Music; Pianoforte, Form and Composition 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-16; Graduate of New 
England Conservatory of Music. 1918; Piano and Theory, Lebanon Valley College, 1919-21; 
Pupil of Ernest Hutchinson, Frances Moor, and Frank LaForge, New York City; Gradu- 
ate Courses at Columbia University in Composition, Improvisation and Musical Pedagogy, 
1922-24; Director of Lebanon Valley Conservatory of Music, 1924 — . 



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RAY PORTER CAMPBELL 

Professor of Organ, Pianoforte and Harmony 

Mus. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; Special Course in Pianoforte and Pedogogy 
at New York School of Music and Art, Summer 1921 ; Master Courses in Organ with 
Pietro Yon in New York, summer 1923 and winter 1924 ; in Italy, summer, 1924. 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD 

Voice Department 

Pupil of Evan Stephens and William Shakespeare in Europe, 1910-13; Concert and 
Opera in America, 1914-15; Taught privately. New York City and Denver, Colorado, 1916- 
27; Instructor in voice, Lebanon Valley College, 1927 — . 



EDITH FRANTZ MILLS 

Department of Voice 

Graduate of Lebanon Valley College. Voice Department. 1908; Student of A. Y. Cor- 
nell. New York, 1909-11; Student of Madam Omstrom-Renard ; Vocal Teacher, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1912; Student of A. Y. Cornell Summer School, 1912-14-17-22; Vocal Teacher, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1923- ; Pupil of Madam Cahier, Curtis Institute, 1924-26; Private 
Pupil of Madam Cahier, 1927—. 



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HAROLD MALSH 

Instrucfor of Violin 

Graduate of the Institute of Musical Art, New York City (Dr. Frank Damrosch, Direc- 
tor) ; Instructor at the Music and Art Institute, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. ; Instructor of Violin, 
Lebanon Valley Conservatory of Music, 1924 — . 



EVERETT MYLIN, A.M. 

Physical Director and Coach 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1916; A.M., ibid., 1917; Officers training Camp, Ft. 
Niagara, 1917 ; Twenty Nine Months, U. S. Army ; American Expeditionary Forces, 
1917-19; Instructor in Mathematics and Coach, Massanutten Military Academy, 1919-20; 
Coach, Iowa State College, 1920-23; Lebanon Valley College, 1923—. 



HELEN ETHEL MYERS, A.B. 

Librarian 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1907; Drexel Institute Library School, 1908; Assistant 
New York Public Library, 1908-10; Cataloger, University of Chicago Library, 1910-11; 
Librarian, Lancaster Public Library, 1912-21; Member of American Library Association; 
Lebanon Valley College Librarian, 1921 — . 



J. OWEN JONES, M.A., D.D. 
College Pastor 



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Board of Trustees c^.- 

•(P President Hon. Aaron S. Kreider *^; 

Vice President E. N. Funkhouser 'v, 

.'>^ Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson y- 

•iii 4 

'^ REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE EAST PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE 7>'; 

Rev. S. C. Enck, AJVL., B.D., D.D Harrisburg, Pa, 1928 ^} 

.f Rev. P. B. Gibble, A.B., B.D Palmyra, Pa 1928 'J. 

;U* Rev. C. H. Holzinger, A.B., B.D., D.D Lancaster, Pa 1928 <^.' 

:•/ Rev. H. E. Shaeffer, A.M Penbrook, Pa. '""" 

Rev. D. E. Young, A.M., B.D Harrisburg 

Rev. B. F. Daugherty, A.B., B.D., D.D Lebanon, Pa. 

Rev. G. W. Hallman, A.M Hummelstown, Pa. 

Rev. J. O. Jones, A.B., B.D., D.D Annville, Pa. 

Mr. J. Raymond Engle, A.B., L.L.B., LL.B Palmyra, Pa 1930 cf)-, 

Mr. John E. Gipple Harrisburg, P^ ■">^f> ^ 

Hon. Aaron S. Kreider, LL.D Annville, Pa. 

Rev. H. F. Rhode, A.M., B.D Harrisburg 

REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE 

Rev. M. R. Fleming, A.B., B.D., Ph.D Red Lion, Pa 1927 

Rev. P. R. Koontz, A.B., B.D., D.D Baltimore, Md 1927 

Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL.B Baltimore, Md 1927 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., D.D Hagerstown, Md 1927 

Rev. L. W. Lutz, A.B., D.D York, Pa 1928 

Mr. R. G. Mowrey Chambersburg, Pa 1928 

Rev. J. H. Ness, A.B., B.D., D.D York, Pa 1928 

Rev. G. I. Rider, A.B., D.D Hagerstown, Md 1928 

Rev. W. M. Beattie Shiremanstown, Pa 1929 

Rev. C. E. Fultz, D.D Washington, D. C 1929 ^■) 

Mr. E. N. Funkhouser, A.B Hagerstown, Md 1929 . : 

Mr. Henry Wolf, A.B Mount Wolf, Pa 1929 O) 



Pa, 


.. ..1928 
1928 


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1928 




1928 


Pa 


.. ..1928 
1929 


vn. Pa. . . 


.... 1929 
1929 


1930 


Pa 


. . . . 1930 
1930 


Pa 


....1930 



Rev. J. H. Brunk, D.D Martinsburg, W. Va 1927 

Rev. G. W. Stover Winchester, Va 1927 

Rev. W. F. Gruver, D.D Martinsburg, W. Va 1928 

Mr. E. C. Wine, A.B Harrisonburg, W. Va 1928 

Rev. J. N. Fries, A.M Berkley Springs, W. Va.. .1929 

Rev. A. J. Sechrist Martinsburg, W. Va 1929 



ALUMNI TRUSTEES 

Prof. H. H. Baish, A.M Harrisburg, Pa 1927 

Mr. A. K. Mills, '04, A.M Annville, Pa 1928 

Prof. C. E. Roudabush, '03, A.M Minersville, Pa 1929 



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^ REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE VIRGINIA CONFERENCE *^.' 

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SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



First Semester 




Second Semester 


CLIFFORD SINGLEY 


President 


MILFORD KNISLEY 


MARY GEYER 


Vice President 


BERNICE HOOVER 


HENRY BRUBAKER 


Secretary 


ANNA MARK 


MILLARD MILLER 


Treasurer 


JACOB HORST 



Pntfc Tlnrty-tis:o 



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Senior Class History 




O with your might what your hands find to do." We have heard 
the above quotation each day (provided we went to chapel) through 
the four years of our college life. The quotation itself without ma- 
terial is worthless, but we are proud to say we possess the material. 
Every campus activity attests the fact. The Y. M. & Y. W., Men's 
Senate and W. S. G. A., the Literary Societies and Literary Clubs, 
all show results of our efforts. We have contributed valuable man power 
to the baseball and basket ball teams. And who, of those on our campus at 
the time, will forget that Sunday in late October, 1927, when the L. V. foot- 
ball squad returned trailing Brown's scalp? '28 is proud to say that we 
were well represented in the back field and on the line in that game. The 
Quittie and La Vie Collegienne show our effort along literary lines. All in 
all, the class of '28 has been able to show practical and powerful results 
since first they came to the campus in 1924, a very green crowd of Frosh. 

The real spirit of '28 was shown for the first time in the Tug of War. 
True, we had won the class scrap, but in the main that was a physical vic- 
tory. The grinding, heart-breaking Tug, almost an hour long, called on the 
greatest moral and physical power of which our men were capable. The 
Tug of our Sophomore year was of a similar nature, but we won both with 
the high calibre of fighting spirit that belongs to '28. 

Our Sophomore year taught us that truly there is strength in team work. 
However, profiting by our mistakes, we strengthened ourselves in unity. 
We entered more fully into college life, preparing for the leadership which 
comes to upper-classmen. As Juniors we published our annual and are 
justly proud of it and of our dramatization of three modern one-act plays ; 
"He", "A Well Remembered Voice", and "The Dark Lady of the Sonnets". 

As a class we have never forgotten that "knowledge is virtue". Our 
stay in college has been filled with good times, but we remember that we 
are students first and foremost. The greatest satisfaction of our Senior year 
is this : at last we have been able to take semester exams in the renovated 
chapel instead of the "bull pen". Now there are only a few short months of 
college life remaining to us. But we continue to move on, and when the unit 
class of '28 is scattered through the world, we feel that L. V.'s favorite 
maxim will be faithfully carried on by each one of us. The same spirit 
which carried us through four years of college failures and successes vic- 
toriously, will color our passage through the school of life. Living up to it, 
we know we have done our best for Alma Mater and ourselves. 

To those who follow after, especially to the class of '29, we can only 
say, "Do with your might what your hands find to do". 



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Ptiffe Thirty-lhree 



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HARRY DARKES ALBRIGHT 
English Lebanon, Pa. Kalozeiean 

College : Glee Club (1, 2, 3) ; Treasurer (3) ; Writers' Club (2, 3) ; President (2) ; 
Readers' Club (2, 3, 4) ; La Vie Collegienne Staff (2, 3, 4) ; Editor-in-Chief (4) ; Men's Sen- 
ate (2) ; Assistant in English (4) ; Christmas Banquet Committee (4) ; Student-Faculty Com- 
mittee (4). Class: First Honor Student (1); Freshman Mathematics Prize (1); Editor-in- 
Chief, Annual (3); Class play (3). Society: Anniversary Program (2, 3, 4); Anniversary 
Committee (3) ; Judiciary Committee, Chairman (3) ; Critic (4) ; President (4). 

LOUISE FREDERICKA BAKER 

English Palmyra, Pa. Clionian 

College: W. S. G. A. (4); Readers' Club (2, 4). Society: Anniversary Program (2). 

JOHN BRUCE BEHNEY 
Bible-Greek Freeland, Pa. Philokosmian 

College: Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Vice President (3); President (4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(2, 3, 4) ; Secretary (2) ; Vice President (3) ; President (4) ; Men's Senate (3) ; La Vie 
Staff (3) ; Debating Team (2) ; Ministerium (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Vice President (3) ; Student- 
Faculty Committee, Chairman (4). Class: President (1); Financial Secretary (2); Guard 
(2); Junior Play Committee (3); Class Play (3). Society: Chaplin (2); Executive Com- 
mittee, Chairman (3) ; Anniversary Program (2, 3) ; Anniversary Committee (3) ; Critic (4). 

C. RAY BELL 
Chemistry Lebanon, Pa. 

College: Basketball (3, 4). Class: Football (1, 2). 

ORAN PASS BOLLINGER 
Biology Lebanon, Pa. Kalozeiean 

College: Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Business Manager (3, 4); Assistant in Biology (3, 4). 
Class: Football (2); Basketball (2). 

MABEL CATHERINE BREWBAKER 
History Waynesboro, Pa. Clionian 

College: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). Society: Anniversary Program (2, 3); Usher (1) ; 
Editor (3). 






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MYRL BROWN 
Annville, Pa. 
Biology Kalozetean 

College: Ex-member class of '18; Baseball (1, 2, 3). 

HENRY YOST BRUBAKER 

Sinking Springs, Pa. 

Mathematics Kalozetean 

College: Men's Senate (2) ; Glee Club (1, 2, 3) ; President L. S. A. (2, 3) ; Y. M. C. A. 

Cabinet (4). Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2); Basketball (1, 2); Baseball (1, 2); Football (2); 

Financial Secretary (2, 3, 4); Class Play (3). Society: Anniversary Program (2). 

JOSEPH CHARLES BRUNO 

Pittston, Pa. 

Chemistry (Pre-Medico) Kalozetean 

College : Assistant Manager (2, 3) ; Manager Base Ball (4) ; Rifle Club (2, 3) ; Pre- 

Medical Society (3); Coach of Sophomore Tug-o-War team (3). Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2); 

Football (2). Society: Sergeant-at-Arms (1); Editor of Examiner (2); Vice President (3); 

Anniversary Program (3). 

LUELLA MAE BURKH OLDER 
Ephrata, Pa. 

Clionian 
G. A. (2, 3); Eurydice (1, 2, 3). Society: Usher (1); Anniversary 



History 
College: W. 
Program (2). 



BENETTA ELEANOR BURRIER 
Newton, N. J. 
English Clionian 

College: Readers' Club (3); Eurydice (1, 2, 3, 4); President (4). Class: Vice-Presi- 
dent (1); Annual Stafif (3); Class Play (3). Society: Anniversary Program (2, 3, 4). 

CATHERINE CHRISTINE CRAVEN 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
English Clionian 

College: Readers' Club (3, 4); Student Volunteer Band (3, 4); Writers' Club (4). 



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Paqe T hirty-five 




Chemistrv 



RALPH ALFRED DAUBERT 
Lebanon, Pa. 



ABRAHAM SHENK DOHNER 
Annville,. Pa 



JOHN PAUL DOHNER 
Annville,. Pa 
Chemistry 
Class: Tug-o-War (1); Football (2); Reserve Football (3,4). 



Philokosmian 



Philrkosmian 



4 



4 



MARION BOWMAN DORSHEIMER 
Lebanon, Pa. 
French 
Society: Warden (2); Anniversary Program (1, 2). 



ADAM IRVIN DUNDORE 
Mount Aetna, Pa. 



Chemistrv 



Delphian 



Kalozetean 



PAUL A. ELBERTI 
Middletown, Pa. 
Education Kalozetean 

College: Football (1, 2, 3, 4); "L" Club (1, 2, 3, 4). Class: Football (1); Basket- 
ball (1). 



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Page Tliirty-iix 



rtS 




KATHRYN FLINCHBAUGH 
Windsor, Pa. 
French Delphian 

College: W. S. G. A. (4). Society; Warden (1); Secretary (1, 2); Anniversary Pro- 
gram (1, 2, 3). Class: Y. W. C. A, Cabinet (1, 2). 

ROY IVAN FLINCHBAUGH 
Dallastown, Pa. 
Chemistry Philokosmian 

College: Assistant in Chemistry (3, 4). Class: Tug-o-War (2); Second Honor Student 
(2). Society: Trustee (3). 

ROY SEIBERT FLOOK 

Meyersville, Md. 

Mathematics Kalozetean 

College: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4); Librarian (2); Treasurer (3); Rifle Club (3); 

Mathematical Round Table (2). Society: Sergeant-at-Arms (2); Recording Secretary (2); 

Vice President (3); Chairman Judiciary Committee (4); President (4). 

EARL WILSON FORNWALT 
*■ Lebanon, Pa. 

Mathematics Kalozetean 

Class: Basketball (1, 2, 3); Football (1, 2). 

OLGA SARA FREEMAN 
Sinking Spring, Pa. 
Political and Social Science Clionian 

College: Basket Ball (1, 2) ; W. S. G. A. (4). Society: Usher (1) ; Critic (4) ; Anniversary 
Program (2, 3); Basket Ball (3). Class Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2): Basket Ball (1, 2). 

CHARLES MAGNUS GELBERT 
Ambler, Pa. 
Education Philokosmian 

College: Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4); Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4); Football (1, 2, 3, 4); Captain (4). 
Class: Football (1); Class Play (3). Society: Recording Secretary (3); Critic (4). 



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Page Tliiriy-se-ven 



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MARY MARGARET GEYER 
Middlefown, Pa. 
Latin CUonian 

College: Delegate to Eaglesmere (2); May Day Committee (2, 3); W. S. G. A. Presi- 
dent (4); Y. W. C. A. Class; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2); Secretary (2, 3); Vice-Presi- 
dent (4). Society; Recording Secretary (3); Anniversary Program (2, 3). 

EDNA CATHERINE GRAHAM 

Conemaugh, Pa. 

Biology CUonian 

College: Readers' Club (2, 3); Mathematical Round Table (1, 2); Assistant in Biology 

(2, 3, 4); Biological Scholarship (2); Biological Reading Club (2); La Vie Staflf (3). Class; 

Second Honor Student (1); First Honor Student (2). Society; Usher (1); Editor (2); 

Anniversary Program (2, 3). 

OLIVETTE LYDIA HAAS 
Intercourse, Pa. 
Social Sciences Delphian 

College; Y. W. C. A. (2, 3). 

MABEL GRACE HAFER 
Chambersburg, Pa. 



English 
College; W. S. G. A. (1, 2 
Delegate to W. I. A. S. G. (4) 



CUonian 
(1, 2) ; Eurydice (1) ; 



3, 4) ; Vice-President (4) ; Y. W. C 

Assistant in Education (3, 4). Class; Secretary (1); Basket 
Ball (1, 2); Vice-President (3). Annual Staff (3). Society: Usher (1, 2); Corresponding 
Secretary (3); Anniversary Program (2, 3, 4); President (4). 



GLADYS SARA LE VAN HAPPEL 
Lebanon, Pa. 
English CUonian 

Society: Anniversary Program (1). 

BERNICE AMES HOOVER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
English CUonian 

College; Readers' Club (3). Society; Anniversary Program (2, 3). Class; Class Play (3). 



Page Tlnrty-eiijht 



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JACOB MAYS HORST 

Latin Reading, Pa, Philokosmian 

College : Glee Club (3, 4) ; Pianist (3, 4) ; Rifle Club (2, 3). Class : Treasurer (1) ; Tu£- 

o-War (1) ; Football (2) ; Annual Staflf, Associate Art Editor (3) ; Stage Manager, Junior 

Play (3). Society: Pianist (1, 2, 3); Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4); Corresponding Secretary (2); 

Anniversary Program (1, 2, 3, 4). 

ELMER ADAM KEISER 
English Reinerton, Pa. Philokosmian 

College : Readers' Club (2, 3, 4) ; Writers' Club (2, 3, 4) ; La Vie Staff (3) ; Intercol- 
legiate Debating Team (2, 3) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4) ; Men's Senate, Secretary-Treasurer 
(3); Vice-President (4); Rifle Club (2, 3). Class: President (2); Tug-o-War (1, 2); Base- 
ball (1, 2); Football (2); Annual Staflf, Associate Editor (3); Class Play (3). Society: 
Executive Committee, Chairman (2, 3); Anniversary Program (2, 3); President (4), 

ALICE J. KINDT 

English Annville, Pa. Clionian 

College: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4); Delegate to Eaglesmere (1); Writers' Club (2, 

3, 4); La Vie Staff (3); Winner of Short Story Contest (2). Class: Annual Staff, Literary 

Editor (3); Class Play (3). Society: Anniversary Program (2, 3, 4); Judiciary Committee 

(2, 3, 4) ; Society Reporter (3) ; Vice-President (4). 

CHARLES MILFORD KNISLEY 
History Red Lion, Pa. Philokosmian 

College: Historical Society (2) ; Manager Football (4) ; Men's Senate (4). Class: Tug-o- 
War (1, 2); Basketball (1, 2, 3,); Football (1, 2); Class Play (3). Society: Secretary (2, 3). 

RAYMOND HEISEY KOCH 
History Palmyra, Pa. Kalozeiean 

College : La Vie Staff, Associate Business Manager (3) ; Men's Senate (3) ; Manager 
Basketball (4). Class: Football (1, 2); Basketball (1, 2); Baseball (1, 2); Class Play (3). 
Society : Anniversary Program (3) . 

HENRY ALLISON KOHLER 
Mathematics Thurmont, Md. Philokosmian 

College : Rifle Club (2, 3, 4) ; Reserve Football (2, 3, 4) ; Mathematical Round Table 
(2). Class. Tug-o-War (1); Class Play (3). Society: Sergeant-at-Arms (1); Correspond- 
ing Secretary (2); Anniversary Program (2, 3). 



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Page T hirty-itine 




UHL RONDO KUHN 
Chambersburg, Pa. 
Chemistry-Biology Philokosmian 

College: Rifle Club, Executive Officer (2, 3. 4); Reserve Football (1, 2, 3); Pre- 
Medical Society (2, 3); Mathematical Round Table (1, 2). Class: Football (1); Basket- 
ball (1). 

RAYMOND KUHNERT 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Mathematics Kalozetean 

Class: Tug-o-War (2); Football (2). 

FRANCES H. LONG 
Bordentown, N. J. 
English Delphian 

College: Annual Staff', Art Editor (3); May Day Committee (3). Class; Vice-Presi- 
dent (3); Basket Ball (2); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2). Society: Warden (1); Correspond- 
ing Secretary (2); Chaplain (3); Recording Secretary (3); Critic (3); President (4). 

LLOYD LUX 
Annville, Pa. 
Mathematics Kalozetean 

College: Reserve Football (2, 3, 4); Reserve Basketball (2, 3, 4). Class: Basketball 
(1, 2, 3); Football (1, 2). 

ANNA CATHERINE MARK 
Annville, Pa. 
English Clionian 

College: Annual Staff (3); Writers' Club (2, 3, 4); Readers' Club (2); La Vie Staff 
(3, 4); Winner Short Story Contest (3). Class: Basket Ball (3). Society: Judiciary Com- 
mittee (3, 4) ; Anniversary Program (3) ; Recording Secretary (4) ; Editor (2). 



c^: 



4 



4 



MONROE HARNISH MARTIN 
Annville, Pa. 
Chemistry 
College: Assistant in Physics (3, 4). 



Philokosmian 



Page Forty 










EMMA REBECCA MEYER 
French Annville, Pa. Clionian 

College: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1); Basket Ball (2, 3, 4); Captain (4); Star Course 
Committee (4). Class: Secretary (3); Basket Ball (1, 2). Society: Anniversary Program 
(3) ; Basket Ball (3). 

SAMUEL MEYER 
Mathematics Hagerstown, Md. Philokosmian 

College: Mathematical Round Table (1, 2); Vice President (2); Men's Senate (4). 
Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2); Football (2); Treasurer (2); President (3). Society: Sergeant- 
at-Arms (1) ; Recording Secretary (2) ; Chaplain (3) ; Executive Committee (3, 4). 

MILLARD JOSEPH MILLER 
Greek Weyers Cave, Va.- Philokosmian 

College : Ministerium (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4) ; Olee Club (3) ; Men's 
Senate (4); La Vie Collegienne (4). Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2); Financial Secretary (1, 2) 
Treasurer (3); Annual Staff, Advertising Manager (3). Society: Sergeant-at-Arms (1) 
Chaplain (2) ; Recording Secretary (2) ; Vice-President (3) ; Anniversary Program (1, 3) 
President (4). 

HARVEY LEROY NITRAUER 

History Middletown, Pa. Philokosmian 

College : Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; "L" Club (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Men's Senate (3) ; Mathematical 

Round Table (2). Class: Football (1); Basketball (1, 2); Guard (1); Class Play (3). 

Society : Guard (1) ; Corresponding Secretary (2) ; Anniversary Program (2) ; Recording 

Secretary (3). 

EDWARD J. C. ORBOCK 
Mathematics Enhaut, Pa, Philokosmian 

College: Villanova (1); Football (2, 4); Rifle Club (2, 3). 



BERYL DEBORAH ORTH 
French Lebanon, Pa. 

Society: Anniversary Program (2). 



Delphian 



4 



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Page Forty-one 




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HELEN ELIZABETH PAINE 
French Lebanon, Pa. Delphian 

College: W. S. G. A. (4). 

PAUL PIERSOL 
Business Administration Coatesville, Pa. Kalozetean 

College : Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Men's Senate (3) ; Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Basketball (2, 
3, 4); Captain (4); "L" Club (1, 2, 3, 4); President (4). Class: Football (1); Basketball 
(1); Baseball (1); President (3). 

WALTER DANIEL PUGH 
Greek Steelton, Pa. Philokosmian 

College : Ministerium (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Mathematical Round Table (1, 2) ; Rifle Club (2, 
3, 4) ; Star Course Committee (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Treasurer (3), Chairman (4) ; Glee Club (3) ; 
La Vie Collegienne StaiT, Business Manager (4); Reserve Basketball (4). Society: Ser- 
geant-at-Arms (1) ; Corresponding Secretary (2) ; Chaplain (2) ; Editor (2) ; Anniversary 
Committee (3). 

DAVID HERR RANK 
Chemistry Annville, Pa. Philokosmian 

College: Assistant in Chemistry (3, 4). Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2); Baseball (1); Foot- 
ball (2); Basketball (2, 3). 

ELSIE MARGARET REIDER 
Latin Middletown, Pa. Clionian 

College: Readers' Club (2, 3); W. S. G. A. (4). Class: Vice-President (2); Secretary 
(2); Annual Staff (3). Society; Anniversary Program (2, 3, 4); Treasurer (4). 

DAVID KENNETH REISSINGER 
Bible Ickesburg, Pa. Philokosmian 

College: Pres. of Band (2); Vice Pres. of Band (3); Student Volunteer (2, 3); Pres. 
(3); Ministerium (2, 3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3). Society: Orchestra (2). 



Page Forty-two 



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SARA LOU ROSE 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
History Delphian 

College: W. S. G. A. (3, 4). Society: Recording Secretary (3) ; Critic (4) ; President (4). 

IRENE JUNE SCHELL 

Mt. Aetna, Pa. 

Education Delphian 

College: Eurydice (1, 2, 3, 4); Vice-President (4); Class: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2). 

Society: Warden (1); Anniversary Program (2); Recording Secretary (3); President (4). 

HOMER CASTLE SCHWALM 

Millersburg, Pa. 

Chemistry Philokosmian 

RUBY ANN SEE 

Roanoke, Va. 

History Clionian 

College: Christmas Pageant Authoress and Directoress (3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). 

Society : Chaplain (4) ; Secretary (3) . 

BYRON SHEETZ 
Halifax, Pa. 
History Philokosmian 

College: Ministerium (1, 2, 3, 4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2); Debating Team (4). Class: 
Tug-o-War (1, 2); Annual Staff (3). Society: Guard (1); Chaplain (2, 4). 

GEORGE CLIFFORD SINGLEY 

Reading, Pa. 

Education Kalozetean 

College : Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; "L' Club (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Vice President (3) ; Men's Senate, 

President (4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4); La Vie Staff (4). Class: Annual Staff, Athletic 

Editor (3); Football (1); Baseball (1); President (4). 



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Page Forty-three 



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RICHARD HERR SNYDER 
Biology /innville, Pa. Kalozetean 

Class: Annual Staff, Photographer (3); Basketball (2). 

ELEANOR REBECCA SNOKE 
Logan, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Political and Social Sciences Clionian 

College: Eurydice (1, 2, 3); May Day Committee (1, 2, 3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2, 
3. 4) ; President (4) ; Delegate to Eaglesmere (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Y. W. C. A. Council Chairman (4) ; 
W. S. G. A. (2) ; Star Course Committee (2, 3, 4) ; Readers' Club (3) ; Assistant in Educa- 
tion (4). Class: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2); Secretary (2). Society: Anniversary Program 
(2, 3) ; Usher (1) ; Corresponding Secretary (3) ; Critic (4). 

MARY NELDA SPATZ 
English Dallastown, Pa. Clionian 

College: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3); Readers' Club (2, 3); Assistant in English (4); 
Writers' Club (2). Society; Anniversary Program (3, 4); Judiciary Committee (3). Class: 
Class Play (3). 

■WALTER EDGAR WAGGONER 
Bible Mcchanicsburg, Pa. Kclozeiean 

College: Mathematical Round Table (1, 2); Ministerium (1, 2, 3, 4); Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet (2) ; Day Student Organization, Vice-President-Treasurer (3) ; Men's Senate (4). 
Class: Treasurer (2); President (2); Annual Staff, College Department Editor (3). Society: 
Chaplain (1, 2) ; Judiciary Committee (1, 2, 3 ;) Chairman (3) ; Critic (2) ; Anniversary 
Program (1); Treasurer (3); Chairman of 50th Anniversary (3); President (4). 

JAMES DEWEY WALLACE 
Education Harrisburg. Pa. Philokosmian 

College: Penn. State (1, 2, 3); Readers' Club (4). 

NORMAN FRANCIS WHEELER 

CoUinsville, Conn. 

Business Administration Philokosmian 

College: Football (1, 2, 3. 4) ; Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Captain (3) ; "L" Club (1, 2, 3, 4) ; 

Secretary-Treasurer (3). Class: Football (1); Basketball (1). Society: Corresponding 

Secretary (3). 



Page Forty-jour 



.■^■.'*o^ 







History 



Latin 



FLOYD WHISLER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



VIOLA MAE WOLFE 
Palmyra, Pa. 



Delphian 

College : Eurydice (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Lutheran Student Association (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Delegate to 
Lutheran Conference (3). Class: Class Play (3). Society: Warden (1); Usher (1, 2); 
Anniversary Program (2); Chaplain (3). 



Chemistry 



ARNOLD HURST ZWALLY 
New Holland, Pa. 



Philokosmian 



College : Assistant in Chemistry (4) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, Secretary (3) ; Mathematical 
Round Table (1, 2); Rifle Club (2, 3); Pre-Medical Society, Vice-President (2). Society: 
Sergeant-at-Arms (1) ; Vice-President (3) ; Trustee (3) ; Treasurer (4). 






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Page Forty-five 




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Page Forty-seven 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



First Semester 




Second Semester 


WAYNE SPARROW 


President 


LAWRENCE DERICKSON 


ELIZABETH MATTHES 


Vice-Pres. 


EDNA GORSKI 


RUTH STRUBHAR 


Sec'y 


FLORENCE MILLER 


FREDERICK MILLER 


Treas. 


MAE HAMER 




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Page Forty-eight 



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Junior Class History 

1/^ /^ f\% Our clear-ringing shout, as of a multitude of voices 
™j7"^^"_^' seemed to echo and re-echo over the campus. Who were 
these young men and young women who seemed to be 
so full of life and pep, so willing to work together? The Freshmen, of course 
— our class of '29. Gathered here from all four corners of the earth, we 
had chosen L. V. as our Alma Mater and we decided to do all in our power 
to be worthy of her. Of course, we became homesick at times, but on re- 
turning we learned that our particular niche in the community had been 
filled by someone else, that our interests had broadened out, and it was in 
the "old home town" that we were exiles, not at school. Then, indeed, did 
we truly desire to labor more earnestly and joyfully. The spirit of cooper- 
ation born anew brought us triumphantly through class activities that first 
year. Possessed of a boundless enthusiasm, with everything new to us, and 
eager to conquer, we chose the motto, "Altiore". .' 

The short separation during the summer months did not weaken our 
new ties and new friendships we had made, but only caused us to return 
more eager for work, looking for new worlds to conquer. Our Sophomore 
year, as well as our Freshman year was tilled with success mixed with de- 
feat, yet above and beyond all we carried that standard, "Altiore". Defeats y 
only urged us on, while successes — well, they made the campus interesting. 
Who does not remember that glorious football game our first year? Or that 
awe-inspiring tug our Soph year when we watched those bodies bend back 
and forth in regular rhythm while the grim look on the boys' faces told of 
an unconquerable spirit. And then the hikes and parties afterward ! We 
had learned to play as well as work together. 

Now that we have come to our Junior year, we find ourselves in that •j) 

particular group called "Upper Classmen". The queerest part of it is, we 
really don't understand why or how we have arrived here. Finding ourselves 
"big sisters" and "big brothers", we realize that we must watch our steps J>> 

or some little Freshman will be imitating us. Who does not desire a certain 
satisfaction from sitting down front in chapel? That, at least, is one time 
when we consider it an honor and not something to be dreaded. As always 
happens, some of our members have been lost to us since Freshman days, C))- 

but it has only served to bind the rest of us more closely together. Among *;■ 

the new responsibilities which have been added we find that our biggest *-j|. 

task has been the edition of this year book. Yet in this also, our motto has 'v. 

urged us onward, striving to excel former records. Good luck to it and may 
we not forget "Altiore", for — 

"A man's reach should exceed his grasp 
Or what's a Heaven for — ?" *4); 



Page Forty-nine 



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English 



HENRY REUBEN AUNGST 
St. Albans, L. I. 



Kalozetean 
act and speech 



"Men are polished, throug 
Each by each 
As pebbles are smoothed on the rolling 
beach." 

Who but Henry would be the proper 
person to grace the first page of the Jun- 
ior section! Henry or "Mooney", as he is 
more familiarly known, is a product of 
Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, the home of 
Arrow Collar models and "unlimited" 
wrestlers. Through his tireless efforts 
the infant drum and bugle corps has 
made rapid strides toward filling the 
gap made by the absence of a band. 
But "Mooney" is not always busy for 
when the work of the day is finished 
he always takes time to amuse the "boys". 
On such occasions he is almost certain to 
give a resume of the latest exploits of 
one brother "Herbie". 

College : Band (1, 2) ; Treasurer (2) ; 
President (3) ; Drum Corps (3) ; President 
(3) ; Men's Senate (3) ; Secretary Y. M. 
C. A. (3) ; Rifle Club (3) ; Debating Team 
(3) ; Annual Staff (3) ; Junior Play Com- 
mittee (3). Class: Tug-o-War (1,2). So- 
ciety: Sergeant-at-Arms (1, 2); Judiciary 
Committee (2); Anniversary Program (2). 



HAZEL IRENE BAILEY 

Winchester, Va, 

English Clionian 

"I would not anticipate the relish of any 
happiness, nor feel the weight of any 
misery, before it actually arrives." 

Hazel comes to us from the sunny South 
where hazel nuts and luscious peaches 
grow. Her slim figure, dusky hair and 
eyes, white teeth, and friendly smile <ire 
a combination of which her native state 
may be proud. We hear that Hazel oc- 
casionally sleeps over-time. Perhaps she 
misses her "Big Ben." As a charter mem- 
ber of the Rebel Club, Hazel gets a big 
"kick" out of donning disreputable clothes 
and impersonating a comical darky. Hazel 
and her roomie are such inseparable com- 
panions that if they were not diametrically 
opposite in appearance, they might be 
taken for twins. Hazel's even temper and 
willing disposition have won her many 
friends who wish her the best in life. 

College: Y. W. Cabinet (2) ; Class: Y. W. 
Cabinet (1, 2): Society: Warden (1, 2). 



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Paffe Fifty 



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JOHN WESLEY BEATTIE 

Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Bible-Greek Philokosmian 

"Of all those acts in which the wise excel 
Nature's chief masterpiece is writing well." 

A busier some-body than this young 
man would be very difficult to find. He 
is truly the "Jack-of-all-trades" for one 
marvels how it is possible for him to get 
his extra curricular duties so arranged 
with his curricular ones so that there is 
always a time for everything. Besides doing 
a part of the art work for the "Quittie", 
he is newspaper reporter, hash-slinger, 
glee-club member, and what not, but still 
manages to hold his own in the classroom. 
Jack, we have bright hopes for the con- 
gregation that secures a minister with such 
versatility. 

College : Glee Club (1, 2, 3) ; Librarian 
(1), Secretary (2); Band (1, 2), Trustee 
(2) ; Drum Corps (3) ; Writers' Club (1, 2, 
3), Chairman Editing Committee (2) ; 
Cheer Leader (1, 2, 3) ; Ministerium (1, 2, 
3). Class: Tug-o-War (1); Baseball (1); 
Art Editor, Annual Staff (3). Society: Ser- 
geant-at-Arms (1) ; Secretary (2) ; Anni- 
versary Orchestra (1) ; Recording Secre- 
tary (3). 



RUSSELL GORDON BECKTEL 

Tower City, Pa. 

Bible-Greek Kalozetean 

"/ will sit down now, but the time will 
come when you will hear me." 

"Behold the Bishop !" From our Freshman 
year when Russell made his debut as an 
orator in Miss bilbo's English class, this 
nicknam.e has been handed down. \Ve 
all can remember the 'Bishop", with his 
one hand stuck deep into his trouser 
pocket, and the corner of his mouth 
twisted downward into what was almost 
a sneer, expound on all manner of things, 
often to the great amusement of his lis- 
teners. Those days have gone, for now he 
seems to be holding himself aloof, but 
not as the monks of old who were con- 
fined to their monasteries. His time is 
divided between tinkering with his Ford, 
calling on a sweet little maiden, and carry- 
ing the Message to his congregation. We 
hope that he can continue in his path and 
"be a shining light" in his chosen work — 
the Ministry. 

College: Rifle Club (1, 2, 3). Society: 
Chaplain (2) . 



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Page Fifty-one 





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MARY AMELIA BENDER 

Annville, Pa. 

Education Clionian 

"Come not within the measure of my 
wrath" . 

"MoUie" and Irene are really twins 
altho' one can not exactly see the resem- 
blance. They are inseparable and almost 
as much one as the famous Siamese twins. 
Mollie is perhaps a little less fond of 
Math problems, and has a number of 
younger brothers and sisters for whom 
she must be a shining example. She is a 
great traveller, having been most every- 
where in the U. S. A. worth visiting except 
Washington, D. C. She is a capable seam- 
stress and makes many of her clothes all 
by herself. Her chief abomination is an 
examination for she always threatens to 
write "It's a lot of bologna" as an answer 
to a question. She is optimistic and 
friendly and as such makes a pleasant 
comrade. 

Society: Anniversary Program (2). 



JOHN ADAM BIXLER 
New Cumberland, Pa. 



"Distance sometimes endears friendship, 
and absence sweeteneth it". 

Any observer happening to be present 
on the campus after a meal will often no- 
tice a good-looking young man, with prom- 
inent facial adornment, his hands tucked 
deep into his trouser pockets, escorting a 
demure young Miss to the post-ofKce. One 
knows inimediately from his bodily car- 
riage that it is our old friend "Spring-in- 
the-heel". It is an easy and pleasant vir- 
tue when neither man nor woman can 
testify anything to his discredit, for John 
seems to keep his things very much to 
himself. However, when there is excite- 
ment of any kind he and his crowd from 
room 30 are always present. Doubts are 
often held as to whether or not they were 
the chief agitators. Our "Johnny" from 
"9-0-6-0" is interested in Chemistry and 
we wish him success, at the same time 
warning him against any organic concoc- 
tions which may blow away the north 
wing of the Ad Building. 

College: Rifle Club (2), Class: Tug-o- 
War (2). 



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ELIZABETH MARGARET BLACK 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Biology Clionian 

"But when he (man shall have been taken 
from sight, he quickly goes also out of 
mind." 

Carefree, irresponsible, happy-go-lucky 
Betty ! Somehow we can't imagine her end- 
ing up as a spectacled, shriveled school 
ma'am, for Betty is a lover of the great 
outdoors. Many were the "botonical" trips 
she took in the woods her Sophomore year 
with a fellow botanist. Then too, Betty's 
father has a hunting cabin some where in 
the wild and wooly district around Lebanon 
where Betty and her girl friends had many 
hair-raising experiences. Her interest in 
Lehigh University was conspicuous until 
for some reason or other Johns Hopkins 
attracted her attention. We regret to say 
that Betty will chuckle like a cackling hen, 
but perhaps a certain red-haired doctor. . ? 
Science can do so much now-a-days. 

Honors — Society: Anniversary Program 
(2). 



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Greek 



WILLIAM CARL BLATT 
Annville, Pa. 

Kalozetean 



"The wo: Id well tried, the sweetest thing 
in life 
Is the unclouded welcome of a wife." 

Though never in the closest contact with 
"Bill", we are certain that he is a busy 
man. A great many of us know his 
ability to debate and orate through par- 
ticipation in Society programs. He is also 
quite a student and takes a keen interest 
in Dr. Reynolds' class in Psychology, for 
the occasions are rare when he is unable 
to answer any of Prof's, brain-racking 
questions. Perhaps we never have "Bill" 
among us because he has a little wife to 
cheer him. With her as his inspiration, 
and the training that he has received here 
at Lebanon Valley, both in and out of the 
classroom, we are sure that the future 
spells, "Success", for him in his endeavors. 

College : Ministerium (1, 2, 3) ; Men's 
Senate (2). Society: Chaplain (1, 2). 



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Page Fifty-three 





MARTIN FISHER BLEICHART 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

"It is a great thing to know the season for 
speech and the season for silence." 

If it is true that the wisest people in 
the world are those who wait for some 
one to do the speaking, "Mickey" surely 
is one wise boy. He joined our class the 
first year and during our first two years, 
even though he commuted, he was pres- 
ent at all our class functions. He was 
especially prompt when we were ready to 
do battle with the "Frosh" and "Sophs" 
in our inter-class contests. This year he 
has visited the "boys" in the dorm very 
seldom and we have missed him much. 
Perhaps it is bashfulness that accounts 
for his quietness and keeps him aloof. 
Then again, there may be someone in 
whose presence his mask falls away and 
he reveals the true friendliness which we 
are sure is hidden there. We know that 
he has a strong determination for the right 
things of life in which we wish him the 
best of luck. 

College: Reserve Basketball (3); Class: 
Football (1, 2) ; Basketball (1, 2) ; Baseball 
(1, 2). 



KATHRYN VIRGINIA BORK 

Lancaster, Pa. 

English Clionian 

"Age can not wither her, nor custom stale 
Her infinite variety." 

A quiet and demure demeanor may con- 
ceal a hundred little imps wilUin. Kit can, 
very easily, be dignified and reserved or 
she can slip off the mask and be a regu- 
lar rogue. Her friends say she gets her 
"rowdyish" spells every now and then. She 
reads quite extensively, is an active mem- 
ber of Readers' Club, and a capable Li- 
brary Assistant. Kit would get 100% if 
examined on School Spirit, high ratings 
on Pep and Willingness to Serve. She is 
an ardent lover of the out-of-doors and 
spends her summers as a supervisor of 
an open air playground, returning to us in 
the Autumn with a healthy coat of tan. 
Kit is ambitious to become a city librarian 
sometime and we predict for her complete 
success. 

Class; Annual Staff (3). Society: Editor 
of O. B. Clio (3); Cor. Sec'y (3), 



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Page Fifty-four 





English 



CAROL EMMA BRINSER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



Clionian 



"The happy have whole days and those 
they use; 
The unhappy have but hoars and those 
they lose." 

If using whole days makes you happy 
then Carol's ready cheer is easily account- 
ed for. She is just about the busiest 
Junior on the campus. There are any num- 
ber of nice things you can say about 
her. In the first place she is an excep- 
tional student. Then too, she is a versa- 
tile public speaker (and private). Those 
who saw the Clio Anniversary program and 
the Junior play know that Carol is quite 
accomplished as an actress. As Literary 
Editor of the "Quittie" she shows her 
skill with the pen. However, there is an 
old adage which says, "If a man has no 
big faults look out for small ones". So 
in order to take away the suspicion that 
Carol has a lot of little faults we attribute 
to her one big fault — she is always on be- 
hind "like an old cow's tail". 

College : Writers' Club (2, 3) ; Treasurer 
(3). Class: Basketball (1, 2); Manager 
(1) ; Junior Class Play (3) ; Annual Staflf- 
Literary Editor (3). Society: Editor (2); 
Anniversary program (2, 3). 



Chemistry 



DOMINIC CALABRESE 
Lodi, N. J. 



Kalozetean 



"But still his tongue ran on, the less 
of weight it bore with greater ease." 

"Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me 
your ears." When one comes to praise a 
man, yea verily, that man must have done 
wonders. So we have come to praise 
"Red" for he is a wonder and has ac- 
complished wonders. History speaks of 
men who have lived before their age. He 
must be one of these. These chronicles 
of time, especially at L. V., will bring 
back memories of one who performed a 
"Steve Brodie" from the balcony of the 
gymnasium, winning for his feat, undying 
fame, and better yet, a maiden fair. Does 
anyone then blame "Mike" for attempting 
a similar feat? In spite of his physical 
incapacities, "Red" is always busy, but 
that smile which causes his eyes to dis- 
appear still remains. 

College: Cheer leader (1, 2, 3); Assist- 
ant Manager (1, 2, 3) ; Mathematical Round 
Table (1) ; Star Course Committee (3) ; 
Men's Senate (3). Class: Tug-o-War (1, 
2) ; Football (1, 2) ; Photographer, Annual 
Staff (3). 



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Page Fifty-five 



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MARY ELIZABETH CLYMER 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Latin Clionian 

"Friendship above all ties does bind the 
heart, 
And faith in friendship is the noblest 
part." 

Mary's life seems to be full of myster- 
ies and secrets. In fact, her irrepressible, 
irresistible giggle heralds the fact that 
she has another secret "under her hat." 
Strangely enough, she gets a real, life- 
sized "kick" out of visiting a brother in 
Fleetwood. Mary actually believes that 
Fleetwood is the capital of the United 
States. (Her classes at L. V. C. are in- 
teresting, too.) Probably like grape nuts, 
"There's a reason", if we only knew. 
Mary's quite a linguist; the "line-up" of 
languages that she's studying would 
make a professional interpreter look dizzy. 
She is, moreover, an active member of 
the Readers' Club and there, as every- 
where, exhibits her ability and willingness 
to do whatever she has been asked. 

College: Readers' Club (2, 3); Society: 
Anniversary Program (2). 



Paffe Fifty-six 



LAWRENCE BUCK DERICKSON 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Biology Kalozetean 

"But his zeal, none seconded, as out of 
season judged, 
Or singular and rash." 

Enter the busy man! "Derry" is one of 
those big plump industrious fellows who 
always has more jobs to take care of 
than any man around the place, but who 
acts deliberately and in time all is done 
in a most successful manner. All the 
fields of Biology and its kindred have a 
lure for him. Many a night has he spent 
in the laboratory with only the alligators 
and the spirits of dead animals to keep 
him company. When day comes he is 
seen marching about with his camera look- 
ing for new sights to grace the pages of 
the 1929 "Quittie," thus making the name 
of "Calabrese and Derickson" famous as 
photographers of merit. His diligence will 
make him worthy of upholding the illus- 
trious name — Derickson. 

College : "La Vie" staff (2) ; Assistant in 
Biology (3). Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2); 
Football (1, 2) ; Advertising Manager, 
Annual Staff (3); President (3). Society: 
Sergeant-at-Arms (1) ; Corresponding Sec- 
retary (2) ; Critic (2). 



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ENOS AUGUST DETWEILER 

Palmyra, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

"Whoever contradicts my sense 
I hate to see, and never can believe." 

The very clever "Ad-man" who wrote, 
"It's the cut of your clothes that counts", 
must have had "Kike" in mind, for he cer- 
tainly has selected one who fits the slogan. 
"Kike" is another of these commuters 
with whom we can only become acquainted 
by making our way to the Day Students' 
Room. Here he and his cohorts hold 
sway and we can imagine that, with his 
ability to tolerate the frivolous, he is a 
huge factor in the contentment of his 
friends. He is not with us as much as 
we should like him to be. No doubt part 
of his time is spent in wrestling with the 
facts of History and Education, but the 
greater portion is spent in Middletown. 
Hence, one can forgive him for not coming 
around more often, as long as he is true 
to the cause. 



^>Wi^|i>^ 



AREA DAVID DISNEY 
Palmyra, Pa. 



"When he speaks 
The air, a chartered libertine, is still." 



The willingness to do things and the 
power to overcome seemingly unsurmount- 
able obstacles are exemplary of this young 
fellow, Disney. He is another one whose 
visits into our domain have become less 
and less every year. He must be "crack- 
ing" the books more than ever, for al- 
though we see him only in the classroom, 
we know from his association there that 
he is quite a student. When any ques- 
tion that concerns either historical or psy- 
chological data arises, he is right there 
with an answer and his "words carry 
weight". With his natural interest in his 
work, we predict that some day in the 
future he will make Wells and PUlsbury 
look to their laurels. This young man's 
triple assets, his knowledge of the sub- 
ject, his pleasing personality taken to- 
gether with his dry humor should aid him 
greatly when he expounds knowledge to 
classes of high school boys and girls. 

Class : Football (1, 2) ; Basketball (1, 2) ; 
Baseball (1, 2). Society: Editor Examiner 
(2). College: Cheer Leader (1). 



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Page Fifty-seven 




EARL HOSTETTER DONMOYER 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Education Kalozetean 

"Opinion in good men is but knowledge in 
the making." 

Simultaneously with the dawning of long 
breeches, the dawning of a great desire 
for wisdom came into the life of this 
young man. He therefore decided to des- 
ert daily the hamlet of his adolescence to 
come to Lebanon Valley for further intel- 
lectual achievements. Earl comes from 
Lebanon. If we could use blood as red 
ink we would underscore the foregoing 
sentence to make it more emphatic. So 
very few Lebanon Valleyites come from 
that place?? 

Who could say more for a man than 
that he puts all he has into everything he 
does? This is typical of Earl and our 
contact with him, though it is limited, 
proves him to be of that quiet industrious 
type which is characterized by silent en- 
ergy. A very reserved young mjin in 
company, he becomes a most genial and 
pleasing companion among his most inti- 
mate associates. It is even said that he 
is also a constant worshipper of that god- 
ness — Romance. 



GEORGE EDWARD DULLABAHN 

Lebanon, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

"He knows to live who keeps the middle 
state 
And neither lecns on this side nor on 
that." 

Besides having the state and nationally 
famous bologna, Lebanon can lay claim 
to having Lebanon Valley's biggest stud- 
ent. Head and shoulders above the mul- 
titude and with bodily width that threat- 
ens to fill entire doorways, with the cold 
eyes of his Teutonic ancestors, "Dutch" 
has certainly filled a "great space" on the 
campus. Although he is not with us al- 
ways it does not lessen his loyalty to 
school and class, nor does it lessen his 
desire for knowledge, for he ranks among 
the foremost in his course of study. His 
demeanor is characterized by a kind of 
severity. But this is only a shell under- 
neath which is a friend as good hearted 
as the best. In spite of the fact that he 
has very little to say, his smile makes his 
acquaintances his friends. We wish him 
man/ mere acquaintances and the best of 
fortune in the fulfillment of his duties 
in life. 

Class: Football (1, 2). 



Page Fifiy-eighl 



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CARL DONALD EBERLY 

Dallastown, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

"I have fed like a farmer; I shall grow 
fat as a porpoise." 

Donald was christened "Gimpy" the 
first year he came to Lebanon Valley. 
This name has "stuck" to him through 
these few years, for each succeeding year 
makes a new impression. Once a "gimpy" 
leg ; then a plastered nose ; and then an 
arm-in-a-sling. Each serves to makes his 
pseudo-name fit better. He may seem to 
be a queer sort of a person to those who 
don't know him, and perhaps even to the 
co-eds he seems bashful, indifferent or 
uncongenial. They, however, do not know 
him, for those of us who have worked 
with him, and played with him for years 
know that there is no better pal than 
"Gimp". When there is any kind of a 
trick "pulled" in the dorm, you can be 
sure that he is an interested spectator, or 
most likely, one of the "agitators". But 
say what we may, all of us know that he 
has chosen for himself the ideal and is 
doing his best to live up to it. 

College; Tennis (1, 2). Class: Tug-o- 
War (2). Society: Sergeant-at-Arms (1) ; 
Secretary (2). 



DAVID J. EDMUNDS 

Minersville, Pa, 

Education Kalozetean 

"His words like so many nimble and airy 
servitors 
Trip about him at command." 

The first knowledge that we had of this 
fellow with the Biblical name came in 
this our Junior year when we heard a 
sweet young thing exclaim, "Who's the 
good looking guy over there." "Spade" 
came into "our fold" from Keystone Nor- 
mal. No doubt he left there because of 
the opressions of the female of the species. 
But then again, what was their loss is our 
gain, for "Spade" has established himself 
in L. V. circles as a good fellow. He ac- 
climated himself to his new place from 
the very first and showed us some of his 
ability when he coached the yearling team 
which so easily defeated the "Sophs". He 
is also a singer of no mean ability, as he 
is a member of our Glee Club. Perhaps 
there are other abilities which will burst 
forth after he has become more "dyed-in- 
the-wool". Our only regret is that he did 
not come to us sooner. 

College: Keystone Normal (1, 2); Glee 
Club (3). 



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Page Fifty-nine 



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% 

WILLIAM OTTERBEIN EMENHEISER 

York Haven, Pa. 
Chemistry Kalozetean 

"The man that blushes is not quite a 
brute." 

This young man from the wilds of York 
County, though the son of a minister, 
seems to have turned from his father's 
footsteps, lured by the sciences and math- 
ematics. As a result, he is one of Prof. 
Grimm's choice pupils. Although chris- 
tened "William" by his parents, this elong- 
ated red head, because of his interest in 
a novel of yesterday, has been named 
"Peter" and his new name remains in- 
tact. "Peter" came among us as a quiet 
and studious fellow and still is the same 
sedate and unassuming person. However, 
he is not nearly so unknown now as then. 
We who have associated with him know 
his sterling qualities and his determin- 
ation to "press forward to his calling". In 
later years when our hair becomes tinged 
with gray, we shall look forward to meet- 
ing "Peter" and his usual "How ah ya!" 

College: Band (1, 2). Class: Tug-o-War 
(2); Basketball (1). 



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RUTH DARLINGTON ESSICK 

Downington, Pa. 

Latin Clionian 

"My fair one, let us swear an eternal 
friendship." 

Ruth is a walking advertisement of "that 
skin >ou love to touch". Her "peaches and 
cream" complexion is only equalled by her 
matchless disposition. She combines dig- 
nity and reserve with a perfectly unman- 
agable giggle and loquacious tendency in 
such a way as to greatly charm her ac- 
quaintances. She came to L. V. C. as the 
winner of a County Scholastic Contest, 
leaving a host of friends and admiring 
populace behind her. Ruth likes all the 
girls and most of the boys in general, as 
well as one Freshman in particular. Her 
outstanding ambition is to get thin, but 
her chief objection to dieting is that it 
is too slow a process. Ruth is rather hard 
to get to know intimately but these who 
have had that privilege will always be 
thankful. 

College: Eurydice (1). 



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Page Sixty 



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SARA JANE FEARNOW 

Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

History Clionian 

"An' fair was her sweet bodie 
Yet fairer was her mind." 

With her ever-ready smile, her naturally 
sweet disposition, and her sympathetic un- 
derstanding, Jane is a general favorite. 
Her popularity, in fact, is so vast as to 
transcend the continent of North A.merica. 
Yea verily ! it extends even to South Amer- 
ica. Is it from there, we wonder, that 
Jane gets those delicious boxes of Fanny 
Farmer Chocolates? We regret that until 
her schedules are arranged to her satis- 
faction, Jane always has trouble to fall 
asleep. Even the reciting of Chaucer's 
"Prologue" is ineffectual. And then the 
mice are so bothersome at night??!!! In 
spite of her annoyances (including a room- 
mate) Jane manages to pull a beautiful 
string of A's and withal keep her modest 
demeanor. We consider ourselves fortun- 
ate to have her rank us as her friends. 

College : Eurydice (1) ; Sec'y of W. S. 
G. A. (3). Class: Secretary (1) ; Vice-Presi- 
dent (2) ; Society : Usher (1) ; Chaplain 
(2) ; Secretary (3) ; Anniversary Program 
(2). 



imS^n 



FRANK GACIAFANO 

Lodi, N, J. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

"Thinking is but an idle waste of thought 

And nought is everything, and everything 

is nought." 

According to "Gas", God employed the 
full measure of his creative skill when he 
fashioned Lodi, with its "police dogs" 
common only to that particular locality, 
and its great "Piece Dye Works". If 
Lodi is the metropolis of "Noith Joisey", 
what a jewel in the diadem some of the 
other cities must be. Frank is one of 
those unobstrusive retiring fellows whose 
ambition to do things and become some- 
one in the world is made manifest by his 
mild manners. Silent! We should ven- 
ture to say that outside of his clique, (the 
"Bowery Boys") very few know much 
about him or where and how he spends 
his time. Whatever time he has between 
classes which is not occupied by slumber 
is spent in equipping himself with the 
sciences necessary to become a doctor. 
We can then wish him the greatest of luck 
in his undertaking. 

College: Baseball (1). Class: Tug-o-War 
(1, 2) ; Basketball (1) ; Baseball (2) ; Foot- 
ball (1, 2). 



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Page Sixty-one 





EDWARD GROMAN 
Lodi, N. J. 



Chemistry 



Kalozeiean 



Page Sixty-tiuo 



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EDNA TERESA GCRSKI 

Garfield, N. J. 

French Delphian 

"Her stature tall — / hate a dumpy woman." 

There are no two "Eddies". There never 
could be. She is or mostly was the imp, 
the rogue, the typical Cap'n Trouble (wit- 
ness the early Freshman days in which it 
was proved that spiffy pajamas may be 
put to u.i extensive use). In addition sne 
is a very charming and attractive young 
woman. She is active and gay, tender and 
reflective, generous and loyal. She's got 
real sporting blood in her and her ability 
on the basket ball floor is unquestioned. 
As an active Delphian member she de- 
lights her audience with her graceful danc- 
ing. Eddie's fondness for candy is innate, 
but her loyalty to her native state makes 
her prefer sweets from home, especially 
the "Oh Henry" brand. Eddie is the for- 
tunate type that is equally popular with 
girls and boys and hence has never lacked 
or ever will lack for a good time. 

College: Basketball (2, 3). Society: An- 
niversary Program (1, 2). 



"Rest is not quitting the mortal career; 
Rest is the fitting of self to its sphere". 

To be in college, to go to class once a 
week, and to go to Lebanon; this was 
Eddie's dream of what college should be 
like. He saw that this was not alto- 
gether the case and is now doing his 
best to change his ways spending only six 
nights a week in t^ebanon and thus 
having some time for study?? Gener- 
ally a part of his evenings are spent in the 
"Y" room where any one who wanders in 
might find him talking to one (or are 
there more?) of his girl friends. "Eddie" 
too, intends to be a scientist, a Newton, a 
Faraday or a Dalton and his years here 
at Lebanon Valley are preparing him for 
his work, either in commercial life or as 
a professor. Future years may find him 
before a class polishing his spectacles or 
drawing a hair line distinction or perhaps 
demonstrating why water is said to run 
up hill. 

College : Rifle Club (1, 2, 3) ; Assistant 
Athletic Manager (3). Class: Tug-o-War 
(1, 2) ; Basketball (1, 2) ; Football (1, 2) ; 
Baseball (1, 2). 



p 







^^rJP'iiTrvS- 



MAE MATILDA HAMER 

Tyrone, Pa. 

English Delphian 

"No man provokes me with impunity." 

Howdy, Texas ! Just what Mae did to 
earn this fitting appellation is not clearly 
understood, but, we ask you, isn't she the 
very image of a broncho buster? Mae 
tries to tell us that her legs got crooked 
from riding a bicycle, but her pretty arms 
(upon which even the photographers com- 
pliment her) would make up for anything 
else. A fun loving nature and a keen 
sense of humor combine to make her a 
jolly good sport and an ever interesting 
companion. In her native "lingo", Texas 
says she always gets "hooked' when 
there's any "dirty work" to be done. Cer- 
tainly, all frequenters of socials can testi- 
fy that there never was a more capable 
"rustler of grub" than she. Here's three 
hurrahs for Texas and a wish that she 
may some day lasso a great prize. 

College : Student Volunteer (1, 2, 3) ; 
Leader (3) ; Ministerium (1, 2) ; Readers' 
Club (2, 3) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2) ; As- 
sistant in Education (3). Society: Anni- 
versary Program (1) ; Committee (3) ; 
Chaplain (2); Rec. Sec'y (3). Class: Asst. 
Treasurer (3) ; Annual Staff (3) ; Junior 
Play Committee (3). 




MRS. FRANCES HAMMOND 
Annville, Pa. 
History Delphian 

"If you would be loved, love and be lov- 
able." 
Was there ever another so busy, cheer- 
ful and contented as our own Frances? 
What the Porto Ricans lost when she and 
her (fortunate husband) stopped teaching 
in that country, L. V. C. gained. No one 
has ever seen Frances when she was 
otherwise than happy; she beams with 
good humor and friendliness. She has 
more to do it seems, than anyone on the 
campus, with her work as Library Assist- 
ant, as an A student, as an active Del- 
phian member, and as the perfect house- 
keeper and companion for Bayard. And 
yet she has time to entertain and to be en- 
tertained, to plan peppy programs, and 
to take part herself in dramatic produc- 
tions. Whatever wheel Frances puts her 
shoulder to is bound to turn: She is 
Capability personified. Her sunny even 
temper and winning personality have 
drawn to her hosts of friends. 

College: Readers' Club (2, 3); Secretary 
(3) ; Christmas Pageant (3) ; Library As- 
sistant (2, 3). Class: Junior Class Play 
(3). Society: Vice-president (3); Annivers- 
ary Committee (2, 3). 



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Page Sixty-three 





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BAYARD LOUIS HAMMOND 

Annville, Pa. 

Modern Languages Kalozetean 

"Everything that lives 
Lives not alone for itself." 

Hammond became one of our number 
our first year at Lebanon Valley and in 
a short time established himself as an 
important member of our group because 
of his ability as a student. His faithful- 
ness to the duties before him has made 
us understand his finer qualities, although 
we come in personal contact with him only 
in the class room. We would know him 
better, but perhaps that is not our lot. 
Bayard has brought with him into our 
college circle, a Mrs. Hammond who has 
been his inspiration through these years. 
Who then is there who would not be urged 
on to do great things? For, is not the 
height of man's satisfaction reached when 
he knows that he has loved well and has 
done his best? 

College: Instructor in Spanish (1, 2, 3); 
Readers' Club (1, 2, 3). 



LEAH ELEANOR HARPEL 

Lebanon, Pa. 

English Clionian 

"Young children and chickens would ever 
be eating." 

Vim, vigor and vitality — these are the 
qualities with which Leah attacks any sort 
of work that she likes. But where her 
vocabulary fails her in expressing a dis- 
taste for a thing, she supplies words all 
her own. For her the whole world is just 
a comic paper, and all the men and wo- 
men merely characters. "There's some- 
thing odd about everyone", she thinks, and 
proceeds to ridicule that characteristic. 
She can entertain by the hour for, in ad- 
dition to being a talented singer, she is 
also a capable actress, and then, how she 
can talk ! Her time may conveniently be 
divided into three cycles : (1) Period of 
dieting; (2) Interlude; (3) Period of eat- 
ing. Leah asserts that she's going to be 
an old maid and marry her profession, 
which is impossible as long as "Dan" 
Cupid is about. 

College ; Eurydice (1) ; Readers' Club 
(3) ; Debating Team (3) ; Class: Vice-presi- 
dent (1) ; Basket ball (1) ; Society : An- 
niversary program (2, 3). 



•I 



Page Sixty-four 



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fTd 



CARL ERNEST HEILMAN 

Lebanon Pa. 

Mathematics Kalozetean 

"There is great ability in knowing how to 
conceal one's ability." 

Now folks, observe the man who plays 
with numbers as a child plays with toys ; 
who takes the science of Physics as one of 
the easiest problems that confronts us in 
this game of life ; who understands the 
wonderful power of learning, and through 
it receives the traits which make a man 
dependable and a help to his fellow mor- 
tals, "Rip" never has much to say, but 
comes and goes daily. In his coming and 
going he frequently mingles with the boys, 
and it is on these occasions he makes us 
aware of the wisdom of his words. His 
earnestness and zeal place foremost among 
our ranks one, capable enough to be an 
assistant in Physics without professing 
to be a master of the subject. The am- 
bition snd self-determination of this young 
man will surely lead to a realization of 
his ideal. 

College ; Mathematics Prize (1) ; Assist- 
ant in Physics (3). Society: Critic (3). 



L.^l 



MIRIAM JEANETTE HERSHEY 
York, Pa, 
English Clionian 

"Where did you come from, baby dear?" 

With her innocent, baby-blue eyes and 
artless prattle, "Mim" could pass for eigh- 
teen months anywhere — if she'd want to, 
but she doesn't. Twenty-four hours expe- 
rience in her Freshman days of wearing 
a baby bonnet with blue ribbons under 
the chin was enough. And anyhow, it's 
nicer to be a real college "coed" and go 
away on jolly week-end trips. It gives a 
better opportunity to indulge any of her 
three hobbies; dates. Dates, DATES. 
"Mim" loves to have something to fuss 
about and luckily, she can always find a 
pain somewhere. Perhaps that accounts 
for the appalling number of cuts checked 
against her name. But chewing gum isn't 
realy a sure cure, "Mim." Nothing is too 
much trouble for her to do to oblige a 
friend. "She's a darn good kid," is the 
universal observation. 

Class; Y. W. C, A. Cabinet (2). 



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Page Sixly-fi've 





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MARION ELIZABETH HOFFMAN 

Lebanon, Pa. 

English Clionian 

"For loveliness 

Needs not the foreign aid of ornament, 
Bui is, when unadorned, adorned the 
most". 

Marion is a cheerful lass with a friendly 
smile for everyone, including Freshmen! 
Her luxuriant brown hair would be a 
crowning glory to Aphrodite herself. We 
are sure there is not a photographer living 
who would pass up a chance to photograph 
Marion. Although quite studious, she is 
never too busy to pause and heln a friend 
along. She is prone to deep reflection 
while in the library, but it is questionable 
whether the time spent there will be of 
any permanent value as the library has its 
distractions. Marion is, however, the kind 
of girl one enjoys being with because she 
is such a loyal, sincere friend. 

College: Readers' Club (3); Society: 
Anniversary Program (2, 3). 



Chemistry 



HARRY LeROY HOVIS 
Emgsville, Pa. 



Kalozetean 



"The mist is dispelled when a woman 
appears. 
Thy purpose firm is equal to the deed". 

Herewith we present "Hap", as this 
young gentleman is known to "the boys" 
and especially to one little lassie from 
Duncannon. Here is one whom we thought 
to be a thorough woman hater, but after 
a year and a half he learned to know Olive 
and then — well, all men are susceptible 
and he is no exception. 

"Hap" is one, in accordance with his 
chemistry terminology, who is a compound 
"hard to best". Serious when occasion 
demands and happy-go-lucky when there 
is no necessity for seriousness. We who 
have known him for three years vouch 
that he is a friend worth having. As a 
student he is conscientious and aggressive; 
as a man, honest and straightforward, de- 
termined to make his way to the top of 
the ladder, where the best in life may be 
obtained and enjoyed. 

College: Faculty-Student Committee (3). 
Class: Tug-o-War (2) ; Football (2) ; Base- 
ball (1, 2); Basketball (1, 2); Captain (2). 
Society: Treasurer (3). 



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Page Sixty-six 





PAUL WESLEY HUNTER 

Erie, Pa. 

History Philokosmian 

"Who does the best his circumstance 
allows 
Does well, acts nobly; angels could do no 
more." 

Hunter came into our ranks last year 
after having spent his first year at Otter- 
bein College. Since he has been among 
us we seldom see him, and it is only from 
our association in the classroom that we 
can understand and know what he is do- 
ing. In him we have found a conscient- 
ious, hard-working student who seems to 
be very enthusiastic about his work. His 
questions in classes reveal this fact. This 
gentleman is leaving no stone unturned 
that might prevent him from presenting, in 
his capacity as a minister, a broad-minded 
and unbiased gospel. We unite in wish- 
ing that the success which he has had 
here may continue with him throughout 
life. 

College : Otterbein College (1) ; Minis- 
terium (2, 3). Society: Vice President (3). 



ESTHER PAULINE KAUFFMAN 

Wernersville, Pa. 

English Clionian 

"Oh love will make a dog howl in rhyme". 

Esther's friends feared that Autumn 
would find her among the missing at L. V. 
C. for there were rumors that a certain 
active little sprite was at work this sum- 
mer. Fortunately for her "gang" Esther 
returned in full glory. However, during 
the summer she conceived an ardent fond- 
ness for everything New Jersian, especially 
New Jersey Ham. But now she finds time 
to do a good deal of visiting and enter- 
taining. One of her particular likenesses 
is to eat of a "covered lunch" with her 
"gang," each cne of which brings a dish of 
unknown quality for the general consum- 
mation. This young lady has a will of 
her own and is not lightly swayed from 
it, "If she will, she will, you may depend 
on't, but, if she won't she won't. So 
there's an end on't". Esther's ambition is 
not a clearlv distinguishable affair but she 
probably will realize it for "where there's 
a will there's a way". 

College: Readers' Club (2, 3). 



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Page Sixty-seven 



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MILES STANLEY KIEHNER 

Cressona, Pa. 

English Kalozetean 

"When I'm not thanked at all, I'm thanked 
enough, 
I've done my duty". 

This good looking young man with the 
"ne'er-to-be-forgotten smile" is the one 
who has shown his ability to do things 
by turning out this 1929 Quittapahilla. Every 
department, every page of this book repre- 
sents ideas which were evolved during 
many sleepless hours, and which mate- 
rialized during the wee hours of the morn- 
ing. This book, therefore, stands out as 
a worthy tribute to his creative skill and 
management and the class of 1929 is justly 
proud of his accomplishment. He is not 
cnly the yearbook editor, but also takes 
an active interest in class and campus 
activities. Withal, he is a good student. 

College ; Historical Society (1) ; Men's 
Senate (1, 2, 3) ; Secretary (3) ; Glee Club 
(2) ; Readers' Club (3) ; Y. M. C. A. Cab- 
inet (3) ; La Vie Staff (3). Class: Treasurer 
(1) ; Tug-o-War (1, 2) ; Baseball (1, 2) ; 
Football (1, 2) ; Editor-in-Chief of Annual 
(3). Society: Pianist (1, 2); Usher (1); Re- 
cording Secretary (2) ; Anniversary Com- 
mittee (3). 




^a^^t^. 



DOROTHY EVELYN KLEINFELTER 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Latin Delphian 

"Begone, old Care, and I prithee begone 
from me: 
For i' faith, old Care, thee and I shall 
never agree". 

Dorothy is a compact bundle of hap- 
piness and glee. She is the typical optim- 
ist. No matter how dark the horizon, her 
cheerful, "See if I care", is still heard. 
Seemingly, her only fault is that she never 
knows to what class she is going. If it 
were not for her friends, she would prob- 
ably end up in a Bible class when she 
was due at Biology laboratory. Her fa- 
vorite indoor sport in pinochle. She is 
extremely devoted and loyal to her friends 
and enjoys nothing better than having a 
jolly good time with her "girls". Just now 
"Dot" declares that "Single blessedness is 
an assurance", whatever that means. If 
the sincere good wishes of friends mean 
anything, "Dot" will continue to have great 
joy and happiness. 

College: Readers' Club (3). 



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Page Sixty-eight 



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ALLEN EDWIN KLINGER 

Sacramento, Pa. 

History Philokosmian 

"Many receive advice; only the wise profit 
by if. 

This young man, a product of the coal 
regions, came to us from Sacramento, (not 
California). He is one of the few who had 
a definite purpose in view when he came 
to college. That purpose being to study, 
he has allowed neither man nor maid to 
turn him from the straight and nar- 
row path that leads to knowledge. 
Co-eds have no attraction for him, neither 
do hikes or parties offer any amusement 
for him. When he seeks companionship, 
he betakes himself into seclusion with 
books — books — books. His ability to keep 
"his head when all about him are losing 
their's" has won for him the respect of 
his classmates. We entertain no doubts 
as to his success in life, but are positive 
that he will do big things in the world 
which will undoubtedly do credit to his 
Alma Mater. 

College : Mathematical Round Table (1) ; 
Glee Club (3). Society: Chaplain (2). 



History 



ORVILLE KUNKLE 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Kalozetean 



"Talent is that which is in a man's power". 

Behold ! a prodigal son has returned. 
After wandering from his rightful home 
and remaining away for a year, he has 
again returned. That indefinable some- 
thing has beckoned to him and he has 
heeded the call. "Kunk" has taken up 
where he left off and has made his pres- 
sence known by putting to work his natural 
abilities. A glance over many of the pages 
of this book will show what the touch of 
a brush in the hand of a master can do. 
The fact that he has just returned and his 
immediate help in making this "Quittie" 
a success shows the spirit of the man. 
Besides being quite handy with the brush 
and paints, he is a very skillful pianist 
and one has only to hear him once in 
order to understand why the boys hurry 
to society when they know that "Kunk's" 
going to "tickle the ivories". We are sure- 
ly glad he has returned and are justly 
proud of his being one of our number. 

Class : Associate Art Editor, Annual Staff 
(3). Society: Pianist (3). 



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I'liffe Sixty-nine 





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MILDRED HARRIET LANE 

Lodi, N. J. 

History Delphian 

"Could swell the soul to rage, or kindle 
soft desire". 

Was there ever a more appropriate nick- 
name than "Midge" for her? She may be 
a little miss but certainly she misses little, 
especially on the basketball floor where, 
if she does look like a "minute", she is 
swifter and surer, if possible. Before tak- 
ing up this sport at L, V. C, her favorite 
winter pastime was skating on the famous 
Saddle River. But although skating had 
to be abandoned, "Midge" soon found that 
college had its compensations. She's quite 
a prompt young person, and one who takes 
to psychology like a duck to water. Grace- 
ful and "petite," "Midge" might dance her 
way right out of a Delphian program into 
musical comedy where opportunities are 
greater and there are more to charm. 

College: W. S. G. A. (1); Basketball (2, 
3). Class: Basketball (1, 2); Secretary 
(1) ; Y. W. Cabinet (1, 2) ; Annual Staff 
(3). Society: Pianist (1); Corresponding 
Secretary (2) ; Recording Secretary (3) ; 
Anniversary Program (1, 2) ; Executive 
Committee (3). 



EDNA ELIZABETH LANG 

Baltimore, Md. 

Education Delphian 

"To what happy accident is it thai we owe 
so unexpected a visit?" 

Edna just joined our ranks this year 
but we agree that it's "better late than 
never" when the new comer happens to 
be a girl like Edna. She is rather reticent 
about herself except when questioned. We 
learned that she had taught school for 
some time before she decided to come 
back to college for her degree. Her neigh- 
bors in the dormitory style her "a peach" 
revel in the "grub" that she so kindly 
scatters among the needy there. From 
what we have seen of Edna we consider 
her an outstanding type of the "womanly 
woman", and sincerely hope that she will 
encourage us to know her better. 

Society: Vice-president (3) 



Page Seventy 



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ANDREW LOUIS LAURIE 

Elizabeth, N J. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

"A noble aim 
Faithfully kept, is as a noble deed, 
In whose pure sight, all virtue doth suc- 
ceed." 

"Andy" is another of the "sheep" who 
wandered into our fold this year. We can 
say but little about him because he has 
not as yet become fully adapted to his 
envioronment so as to permit him to mingle 
with the "boys". However, the spirit of 
aloofness will gradually pass away and he 
will be revealed to us in his entirety. We 
already know that he is quite the "stude" 
and is surely the 'high light" in the Phy- 
sics class. It takes a master mind to be 
that. Outside of class "Andy" is the 
dorm's celebrated yodler. You have heard 
of fellows triple-tonguing in trumpet play- 
ing but he is also the original triple- 
tongued whistler. His repertoire includes 
anything from jazz to grand opera and his 
whistling offers quite a novelty for the 
fellows. We are glad you have joined us, 
"Andy", and hope we have made you feel 
that you are one of the "Boys". 

College: Rutgers University (1, 2); Bas- 
ketball (3). Society: Recording Secretary 
(3). 



EDITH CATHERINE LIGHT 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Education Clionian 

"1 profess not talking; only this 
Let each one do his best". 

Edith came to us as a Sophomore from 
Hood College. It is extremely difficult to 
know this young lady as she is very re- 
served and quiet about her own aflfairs. 
Calm and sedate, she presents a very tran- 
quil and unruffled exterior to the world 
at large. Among her close friends, how- 
ever, she is more self-revealing. Mathe- 
matics for her is a delight, or should one 
say, obsession? She is a true-blue friend 
that can be counted on in weather sunny 
or stormy. If she realizes her ambition 
to become a Math, teacher, she will, with- 
out doubt, be eminently successful. 

College; Hood College (1). 



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Page Seventy-one 








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English 



RUTH ELLEN LIGHT 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Clionian 



"'Cause I's wicked — / is. I's mighty 
wicked, anyhow, I can't help it". 

Words fail when one tries to describe 
Ruth. Pep, "go", snap, dash, all the racy 
synonyms just fall flat. She is the out- 
standing exception to the rule that names 
go by contraries for where Ruth's sparkle 
and animation is, how could there be dark- 
ness? She is a firm believer in the two 
good old maxims: "Never do today what 
you can put off 'till tomorrow", and "Plea- 
sure before business". Her popularity is 
attested by the fact that as "Miss Leban- 
on", the winner of a popularity contest, she 
spent a delightful two weeks vacation at 
the seashore. Her pet abomination is an 
early class, any of which when obliged to 
attend she calmly sleeps through in very 
impartial fashion. In addition to her own 
Alma Mater, Ruth is interested in both 
Penn State and Franklin and Marshall. Her 
clever originality and pleasing personality 
are fair indications that her popularity will 
never wane but will increase with the 
years. 

Class: Vice-president (1); Basketball 
(2). Society: Anniversary Program (3). 



WAYNE AUGUST LIGHT 
Lebanon, Pa. 



History 



Kalozetean 



"To be or not to be, that is the question". 

Wayne, otherwise "Mose", is one of the 
"bright spots" on the campus. He is one 
more of the Lights whose illustrious name 
has served as an inspiration for that won- 
derful and melodious song — "Fight! Fight! 
Fight ! for old 'Mose Light' ". "Mose" or 
"Wiener" is also the real "Hot Dawg" dis- 
penser and though he had decided to stay 
in the dorm this year, he changed his 
mind, as men do, and thought that he 
could not forsake his business for the 
pleasure of our company?? He should 
have come with us because we know that 
his humorous expressions would have 
added more life to the few (?) little get- 
together-parties that we have from time to 
tim.e. Perhaps there's more than the busi- 
ness that attracts his attention. Is it in 
Lebanon or where? 



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LEWIS ARCHIE LUTZ 
History York, Pa. Kalozetean 

"Heart to conceive, the understanding to 
direct, or the hand to execute". 

Attractive ! Nothing else but, and who 
can blame the fair ones for looking twice 
at this 20th Century Lothario with those 
natural wavy locks and that well-trimmed 
moustache which he has added to his al- 
ready handsome physiognomy? However, 
Archie has straightened out this lady affair 
in a very businesslike manner. Besides 
this little matter, Archie is a very busy 
young man, due to the various responsibili- 
ties that are thrust upon him through his 
connection with a host of campus organi- 
zations. In addition, he was entrusted with 
the business duties that go into the mak- 
ing of this book. This in itself is rather 
a strenuous job, but he has shown him- 
self highly capable of doing all these 
things. 

College: Assistant in German (3); De- 
bating Club (3) ; President (3) ; La Vie 
Staff (3). Class: President (1); Football 
(1, 2) ; Captain (2) ; Tug-o-War (1, 2) ; 
Business Manager of Annual (3) ; Junior 
Play (3) ; Business Manager of Play. So- 
ciety: Sergeant-at-Arms (1); Recording 
Secretary (3) ; Corresponding Secretary 
(2) ; Vice President (3) ; Chairman Anni- 
versary Committee (3). 



■=>?!T;^ji>^ 



ELIZABETH JOHANNA MATTHES 
History Reading, Pa. Delphian 

"To a woman, the consciousness of being 
well dressed gives a sense of tran- 
quility which religion fails to bestow". 
Something wonderful happened to "Betz" 
this year — she has had a moral conversion. 
Before, she didn't believe in love but now 
— well, of course we mustn't give her 
away. When she first made her appear- 
ance at college she was rather quiet, sweet 
and lovable but very "hard to get to know". 
Fortunately, quite a number were able to 
overleap the barrier of her reserve and 
have become her intimate and loyal 
friends. These agree that "Betz" is not 
"terribly" studious, that she is a good sport 
and always out for a good time. For some 
reason or other "Betz" kids all the poor 
little Freshmen into thinking that she was 
once a snake charmer for Barnum Sc 
BaUey's Circus. Whatever her past may 
have been, it is not going too far too pre- 
dict a happy future, with perchance a 
residence in New York whither her eyes 
are longingly turned. 

Class: Vice-president (3). Society: An- 
niversary Program (1). 



•^A^•;^■■^.■•^■•■^')A!••^?^^•i^■1A•■■••!S^.;:^•■^£^.■'^^^ 



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Page Seventy-three 





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CLARENCE LANSTON MENTZER 
Valley View, Pa. 



Latin 



Kalozetean 



"1 have taken a wife; I have sold my 
sovereignty for a dowry." 

Again we are met with one of those re- 
ticent ones who quietly shoulder the bur- 
den of study and proceed in their work 
until they have accomplished the desired 
end. Mentzer has worked hard and his 
success is evidenced by the things he 
does. He possesses, among other things, 
a great capacity for good hard work, a 
keen and understanding mind, and a pleas- 
ing personality. By his unassuming man- 
ner he has made a host of friends where- 
ever he has gone. With the inspiration 
that he has, he is bound to make his 
mark in life both professionally and so- 
cially. He is known to have considered 
marriage a great institution, and although 
the entrance requirements are rather high 
and the curriculum extremely difficult, he 
has made "the grade" and we wish him 
the best o' luck. 

College: Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Secretary 
(3). Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2); Football 
(2); Baseball (1, 2). Society: Pianist (2). 



t'liffe Seventy-jour 



FLORENCE MAURINE MILLER 

York, Pa. 

English Clionian 

"Heaven ne'er helps the men who will 
not act." 

Tall, languid, and elegantly slim. Miss 
Florence goes her tranquil way, impervi- 
ous to the trivialities that pester other 
poor mortals. But then "Flo" is really 
ambitious — she wants ever so much to 
look like Greta Garbo and shh! she's 
got a secret desire to be "Jigger Board" 
president. It is perhaps due to these 
lofty aspirations that she gives the im- 
pression of being "deep." One must be 
either a mind reader or a magician to get 
anything out of "Flo." "Johnnie's" last 
name should be Houdini for he didn't 
seem to have any trouble. If "Flo" is 
as true to man as to woman, there will 
never be any secrets given away for she 
has the splendid reputation of being ab- 
solutely faithful to a confidence. 

College: Eurydice Club (3). Class: 
Secretary (3). Society: Cor. Secy. (2); 
Anniversary Program (3). 



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Page Seventy-five 



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FORREST WILLIAM MILLER 

Annville, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozstean 

"There are two tragedies in life. One is 
not to get 
Your heart's desire; the other is to get it." 

A great deal unlike General Cords, 
Forrest did not "go a long way to make 
friends," for his home is right here in 
Annville and his friends have come to 
him. "A moral, sensible, and well-bred 
man", the most casual observer can dis- 
cern. There is also that unruffled com- 
posure, the unassuming attitude, the be- 
nign disposition, and the equipoised tem- 
perment, necessary attributes of one who 
expects to make his way through the 
world without "blowing his horn" too 
loudly. He is one of those few who ac- 
complish great things in a busy world 
without attracting unusual attention. But 
let him linger in your presence and you 
are finally enveloped by his naive and 
sparkling humor and his quaint Pennsvl- 
vania Dutch colloquialisms. One with 

such finality of ideal and purpose must 
surely reach the highest pinnacle attain- 
able. 



College: Glee Club (3). 
Class: Tug-o-War (1, 2). 



FREDERICK KEIPER MILLER 

Lebanon, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

"Gentle in manner, strong in performance." 

A blast of trumpets, a crash of drums, 
and lo ! — Frederick Keiper. That, how- 
ever, is too poor an accompaniment for 
this young man, one of those rare speci- 
mens — a good athlete, a good socializer 
and withal a good student. Few possess 
the varied talents of this lad. He plays 
basketball of a professional type, is at- 
tractive and has the ability to offer good 
qualities of entertainment. "Fritz" expects 
to be a professor some day and we know 
he will give his classes the "right dope" 
about history, even from the time of 
Adam. It may be better that he should 
be an engineer, for rumors are afloat that 
he is contemplating the erection of a pri- 
vate telephone line across the campus. 
But then almost every fellow has some- 
thing that causes someone to envy him 
and "Fritz" is no exception. Well here's to 
you, "Levi", the opportunity is yours for 
the taking. 

College : Basketball (2, 3) ; Faculty Stu- 
dent Committee (2) ; "L" Club, (2, 3 ). 
Class: Basketball (1, 2); Treasurer (3). 










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IRENE MARGIE MILLER 
Annville, Pa. 



Latin 



Clionian 



"Be calm in arguing; for fierceness makes 
Error a fault, and truth discourtesy." 

Irene is one of those nice Annville girls 
who calmly sauntered through the doors 
of A. H. S. and just naturally kept on 
walking into the doorway of Lebanon Val- 
ley College. However, Irene came with 
a very special recommendation — she had 
been valedictorian. But "you'd never 

know it, would you?" we hear her mod- 
estly disclaim. Just before its time to 
close the door, Irene pops into class look- 
ing very solemn but it isn't long until 
we hear that girlish giggle. She is an 
industrious solver of Math, problems and 
a mighty good basketball player. She 
spends much time in the mountains where 
each summer she renews her intimate 
acquaintance with a tray. If she stands 
by her parent ambition ,she may become 
a school marm, in Porto Rico. 

College: Basketball (1, 2, 3); Class: 
Basketball (1, 2); Society: Anniversary 
Program (2). 







JANET MAY MILLER 
York, Pa. 
Mathematics Delphian 

"You are a devil at everything, and there 
is no kind of thing in the 'versal world 
but what you can turn your hand to." 

Janet is a delightfully provoking con- 
tradiction. On first sight we take in the 
long, waved, golden locks and sky blue 
eyes, and uncertainly, we tell ourselves 
we are beholding an ethereal, poetic vision. 
But in a few minutes the subject of our 
dubious speculations breaks into a pierc- 
ing whistle, a boisterous laugh, or a man- 
nish stride, and in a short while our 
mental index rearranges itself. "Oh, ath- 
lete," we think. And then comes a 
pageant of some sort. Down comes the 
rarely seen really long hair, a pantomine 
costume is donned, and lo ! there we have 
our original angel again. We return to 
normality and Janet is just a regular or- 
dinary girl. But happily there are those 
who continue to see her as the "dream 
girl." However, normality with its school 
life, it's friendships, its basektball games, 
its debating, and its profs isn't such a 
bad life after all, is it, Janet? 

College: Basketball (1, 2, 3) ; Star Course 
Committee (2) ; Debating Team (3). Class: 
Basketball (1, 2). Society; Warden (2); 
Anniversary program (1, 2). 



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Page Seventy-six 







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MIRIAM LYDIA MUTH 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

English Clionian 

"Tho' she is little, she is fierce." 

"Petite child", some one murmured 
kindly. "O, thank you", was Miriam's 
grateful response, "I thought you'd say 
"skinny youngun'." That is what demon- 
strates her outstanding characteristic, an 
irrepressible sense of humor. She may 
not be "long" in bodily structure but 
neither is she short in ability. She has 
a very quick mind and a nimble wit, to- 
gether with what she will tell you is a 
"suimy" disposition. Her favorite diver- 
sion is playing solitaire, especially since 
her favorite song became "Just a Mem- 
ory." The young lady has an alarming 
tendency to talk furiously and frequent- 
ly and a decided propensity for argu- 
ment. It is a constant source of annoy- 
ance to her that she will blush. When 
she faUs to get her eight hours of sleep 
she resembles nothing so much as a 
fussy hen. The literary field to which 
she aspires should prepare to greet a 
daisy. 

College : Writers' Club (2, 3) ; Debat- 
ing Team (3). Society: Editor of "Olive 
Branch" (3). 



RUSSELL CONWELL OYER 

Shippensburg, Pa. 

Bible-Greek Philokosmian 

"Cheerful at morn, he wakes from short 

repose. 
Breathes the keen air, and carols as he 

goes." 

It has often been said by men innumer- 
able that some are born lucky, others are 
born, and yet others have friends. We 
are able to classify the beaming counte- 
nance of friend Russell in all three of 
the catagories for he has been so for- 
tunate as to have attained a very abun- 
dant share of each. Throughout the past 
three years of his career within these ivy- 
covered walls his spontaneous wit and his 
dry humor have made for him a host 
of friends. Besides being famous as one 
of Calabrese's cheer leaders, he takes an 
active part in college and class affairs. 
A successful student and a steadfast 
friend characterizes him as one of whom 
our class can be proud. 

College: Glee Club (1, 2, 3), Treasurer 
(3) ; Ministerium (1, 2, 3) ; Star Course 
Committee (1, 2, 3) ; Cheer Leader (1, 2, 
3); Band (1, 2). Class: Baseball (1) ; 
Basketball (2); Class Play (3). Society: 
Sergeant-at-arms (1) ; Chaplain (2) ; An- 
niversary Orchestra (1, 2) ; Chairman of 
Executive Committee (3) 



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Page Seventy-seven 



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STANLEY ANTON PIELA 

Lodi, N. J. 

Education Kalozetean 

"He would talk of nothing but high-life 
end high-sounding company." 

"Stretch" is a stalwart Jerseyite from 
the wilds of Lodi who enjoys basket- 
ball like most of us enjoy a piece of 
cake. To see the grace and agility with 
which "Stan" dribbles down the floor mak- 
ing his opponents look ridiculous when he 
twirls the ball about on his one hand 
is a rare pleasure in itself. However, 
to watch the ball as he "whips" it through 
the cords" is the supreme joy of the 
school. Yet basketball is not his only line 
for he has been a member of the Varsity 
baseball and football teams for two years 
and here too does his "stuff" with his 
usual brilliancy. 

Though a trifle bashful, his sunny dis- 
position and obliging personality have won 
for him a multitude of friends, and we. 
The Class of '29, are ju;tly proud of 
claiming him as one of our number. 

College : Football (1, 2, 3) ; Basketball 
(2, 3); Baseball (1, 2); Rifle Club (3), 
"L" Club (1, 2, 3). Class: Basketball (2). 



PALMER EDWARD POFF 

Dallastown, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

"Get your facts together first and then 
you can distort 'em as much as you 
please." 

Palmer evidently took to heart what 
Mark Twain wrote concerning journalism 
— at least that's what most of the boys 
think as they read the "ghastly details" 
that he has placed under their pictures. 
"Put 'er" — (now please don't ask where 
or how he got that name), however, is 
very reli.nblc under ordinary conditions 
of temperature and pressure, so that the 
above must not be taken too literally. He 
is quite active in class, society and other 
campus activities (?) holding offices of 
importance from time to time, and "lest 
we forget", a much envied one in the 
York County Grange. After waiting pa- 
tiently for two years this "chappy" burst 
forth with an hirsute appendage all his 
own. The results? Look around! 

Class; Treasurer (1); President (2); 
Basketball (2) ; Associate Literary Editor- 
Annual (3). Society: Recording Secretary 
(2) ; Chairman Anniversary Banquet Com- 
mittee (3). 



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LUTHER M. REARICK 

Mifflintown, Pa. 

Business Administration Philokosmian 

"To be happy here is man's chief end 
For to be happy must needs be good." 

Rearick meandered into our midst after 
a sojourn at Penn State and he immedi- 
ately made his presence known by his 
ability to do things. The first weeks of 
school saw him a daily frequenter of the 
tennis courts where he demonstrated his 
ability in handling the tennis racquet. 
When the Glee Club broadcasted its call 
for men his basso secured for him a 
place in the ranks. Then when the drum 
corps needed a drum major, he was the 
one for the place, his work with the baton 
having made him a very conspicuous figure 
at the head of this organization. He has 
shown by his work that he is also helping 
to make his Alma Mater "bigger and 
better". We feel sorry for Penn State 
because she had to lose him, but pride 
ourselves that he has joined us. We only 
wish that he would have come to us be- 
fore he did. 

College : Penn State (1, 2) ; Drum Corps, 
Drum Major (3); Glee Club (3). 
Society: Vice-president (3). 



RUTH ELIZABETH REIGEL 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

English Clionian 

"The silence that accepts merit as the 
most natural thing in the world, is the 
highest applause". 

This unassuming girl never blows her 
own horn but one need not be around 
her long before her real worth and high 
ability shine forth. In spite of the fact 
that she was continually taking extra 
hours, she has managed to lead her class 
scholastically ever since she entered col- 
lege. Her interests are not wholly con- 
fined to her studies, however. With a 
rifle over her shoulder and her faithful 
dog, "Nellie", scampering ahead, Ruth is 
frequently seen en route to her beloved 
mountains. She is fond of all kinds of 
riding too, but prefers a certain Dort 
which calls for her at school not infre- 
quently. Her natural ability plus con- 
scientious application will make her an 
object of regard wherever she goes. 

College: First honor student (1, 2). 



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History 



HAROLD CALVIN RIDER 
Hagerstown, Md. 



Philokosmian 



Latin 



"But the fruit that fall without shaking 
Indeed is too mellow for me". 

Diminutive in stature, but great in spirit 
— so we have found "Scrunt". Although 
he is only of "half-pint" size, this is no 
serious drawback to his activities. He is 
a true friend, a hard worker (when it 
comes to dumping beds), and that twisted 
grin has made for him a host of friends 
who are ready to stand by himi one 
minute, and — jump on him the next. He 
is the "agitator extraordinary' with just 
enough deviltry about him to make him 
delightfully wicked. When an innnocent 
pedestrian passing the Boys' Dorm is 
splattered by the contents of a paper bag 
which comes from "who knows where", 
the first question is, "Where's 'Scrunt' 
Rider?" In a great majority of the cases 
this culprit has been unearthed. 

In all, despite his "deficilties" he is 
a real pal and we shall indeed be sorry 
to leave him when our days here are 
ended. 

College; Band (1, 2); Glee Club (3). 
Class: Baseball Manager (1). Society: 
Pianist (1, 2) ; Anniversary Orchestra (1, 
2) ; Recording Secretary (3) ; Chairman- 
Executive Committee (3) ; Trustee (3). 



IRENE AGNES SCHROPE 
Valley View, Pa. 

Delphian 



"So gentle, mild and staid, 
She surely seems a model maid, 
But, gentle reader, mark you well 
You cannot sometimes always fell." 

Irene is another of those friendly girls 
from South Hall. On first impression she 
is a rather quiet, capable girl, a fine 
student, and a good friend. But she is 
more than that. She has a social per- 
sonality and takes an infinite deal of 
pleasure in making "wise cracks" and in 
eating cake. She is a silent admirer of 
scientists, — all scientists in general and 
one in particular. Her own good stand- 
ing with her instructors is evidenced by 
by the fact that she has been chosen to 
assist in both German and French. Now 
if she would only be asked to assist in 
the Science Department! It's all right, 
of course, Irene, but "we're on to your 
curves." 

College-French and German Asst. (3). 



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EMMALINE MAY SHAFFER 
New Cumberland, Pa. 



Latin 



Clionian 



^. 



"Zealous yet modest, innocent though free, 
Patient of toil, serene amidst alarms. 
Compassionate in care, amiable in charms." 

Always in a hurry yet not too rushed 
to give a friendly smile and a helping 
hand — that's Emma. She's one of the 
busiest and also of the happpiest girls on 
the campus. No wonder! They say she 
still believes in fairies and Santa Claus 
and we're sure she's the co-worker of 
"Bunny." Emma came to us as the win- 
ner of the County Scholastic Scholarship 
and in spite of the fact that she takes 
part in many extra-curricular activities, 
she "keeps up her end" scholastically 
as well. Sometime we; would like to 
see Emma embarked on the career that 
would suit her best — that of the loving 
and helpful wife of a fine, young minister. 
Of course, we wouldn't mention any 
names. 

College: Social Chairman, Y. W. ; Dele- 
gate to Eaglesmere (2) ; Secy.-Treas., De- 
bating Club ; Library Asst. Class : Asst. 
Treas. (2) ; Y. W. Cabinet (1) ; President 
(1) ; Society : Warden (1) ; Chaplain (2) ; 
Anniversary Program (2) ; Corresponding 
Secy. 



FLORENCE ADELE SILBER 
Newark, N. J. 
Education Delphian 

"Whatever sceptic could inquire for, 
For every why she had a wherefore." 

This young lady, universally known as 
"Fannie," came to us her Sophomore year 
from the Newark Preparatory School. 
She insists that she doesn't study, but 
she wishes she "could." However, no 
one else that could talk as rapidly as 
Fannie would "plug away" at lessons 
either because the profs couldn't follow 
anyhow. Fannie loves to go shopping for 
she will tell you confidentially that she's 
going to be a business woman some day 
and have a shop of her own, Reading 
and painting are her two favorite occupa- 
tions as she is quite talented in the 
latter. In fact, she spent one summer 
at an art school and some of the beauti- 
ful presents that her friends have re- 
ceived bear striking evidence of her abil- 
ity. Fannie impartially addresses each 
and every one of us as "my dear" and, 
as far as we have discovered, is still 
heart whole and fancy free. 

College: Readers' Club (2, 3); Mathe- 
matical Round Table (1). 



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WAYNE GROSS SPARROW 

Wormleysburg, Pa. 

Business Administration Kalozetean 

"Ambition like a torrent ne'er looks back." 

"Speb" is the true bnsiness man from 
start to finish for the term, "Business is 
business," is typical of his outlook on life. 
If you are searching for a man to look 
very carefully over your "debits and 
credits" we recommend him because we 
feel certain that he can fill the bill. His 
work for Professor Stokes has been of 
the highest type as the record in the 
department speaks for his ability. Busi- 
ness surely has become his hobby and 
needless to say, he is taking full ad- 
vantage of it (that is during the week). 
His week-ends are spent back home, but 
then that is some more of his "business." 
He has worked hard for three years 
striving to become a manager in one of 
the sports. A manager, according to the 
dictionary, is "one who directs or conducts 
anything, a skilled economist, etc." More 
business ! 

College; Athletic Assistant Manager; 
Student-Faculty Committee (3) ; Historical 
Society (1); Rifle Club (3). Class: Treas- 
urer (2) ; Football (1, 2) ; Basketball (2) ; 
Sales Manager- Annual (3) ; President (3). 
Society: Critic (2). 



RUTH ANNA STRUBHAR 

Pottstown, Pa. 

English Delphian 

"Ah, don't say that you agree with me. 

When people agree with me I always feel 

that I must be wrong." 

A valuable member of the class is 
Ruth, in spite of the fact that she will 
have her little weaknesses. For instance, 
Ruth just will waste perfectly good time 
having confidential "chins' with the girls 
at all hours of the day or night. The 
friendly, hospitable nature of "Tomhorse" 
makes every visitor feel at home whether 
in the dorm or over at "Aunt Mary's" 
where she spent her first two years. Be- 
sides being a student, Ruth finds time 
to write for "La Vie" and the "Quittie" 
and to keep up her work on the piano 
and organ If her ability as an accom- 
panist is any indication of what she could 
do as a life time companion, we pre- 
dict complete satisfaction for her choice. 

College ; Eurydice (1. 2, 3) ; Readers' 
Club (2, 3) ; Chairman Program Commit- 
tee (3) ; Writers' Club (2) ; La Vie Staff 
(2, 3) ; Student Volunteer (1, 2, 3) ; Y. W. 
Cabinet (3) ; Delegate to Eaglesmere (2) ; 
Class: Annual Staff, Conservatory Editor; 
Secretary (3) ; Society : Chaplain (1) ; 
Pianist (2); Anniversary Program (1, 3). 



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KENNETH CHARLES STUCKEY 

Hershcy, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

"Happy am J, from care I'm free, 
Why aren't they all contented like me?" 

"Lest we forget" — we wish to present 
herewith the "pride" of Hershey, wishing 
that you could all make the acquaint- 
ance of this intellectual looking chap. 
This jolly, round-faced cherub with the 
merry twinkle in his eye comes from the 
"chocolate town" and it certainly did a 
good job in sending this bit of avoirdu- 
pois (?) to us. "Ken" is just what a 
man of his build should be ; happy and 
gay, and with that he has incorporated 
his ability to tear apart all the formulae 
of Physics and Chemistry and thus show 
that he is also a student of no mean 
ability. In the day students' room where 
"men are men and Frosh are dumb," he 
and the other half of the Stuckey com- 
bination reign in their glory. "Ken," 
above all, is one jump ahead of any of 
his classmates not only in connection 
with his class work, but due to the fact 
that "everyone loves a fat man." 

Class: Football (2). 



RUSSELL RODGER STUCKEY 

Hershey, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

"Our deeds determine us, as much as 
we determine our deeds." 

This is another of those "college boys" 
who hails from up Hershey way. Yes, 
he is a brother to the other one. Would 
you believe it? Of it's many wonders, 
Hershey is noted chiefly for three things ; 
its chocolate plant, its park, and "Russ." 
Of these, the latter is the most im- 
portant. He is one of those carefree in- 
dividuals, being all that a college man is 
supposed to be and for whom, "variety 
is the spice of life." Consequently life 
to him is a pleasure, and as to the fe- 
male of the species — well, each date is 
a new face and each new face is a new 
love. Can one wonder then that he is so 
well versed in parlor etiquette? "Russ," 
too, is seeking to discover the relation- 
ship between atoms and molecules as 
well as the "fourth dimension." We shall 
hope at some future time to hear that 
he has made some very important dis- 
covery that may increase the longevity 
of the nation and thus increase the pres- 
tige of his class and school. 



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CHARLES ROBERT TROUTMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry Kalozetean 

"He fills his lifetime with deeds, not in- 
active years." 
This unassuming gentleman with the 
stray locks and the quizzical smile claims 
Lebanon as his home town. His ex- 
pression, though, is very deceiving for 
behind those bashful eyes there is a pro- 
found interest in a number of things, in- 
cluding the "can" that Ford built. He 
is the proud owner of one of those me- 
chanical miracles which is so highly 
recommended as a healthy adjunct to 
one's collegiate and scholastic activities. 
By this means he can travel like a po- 
tentate from his home to the door of the 
Ad Building. Ah — those luxurious, mag- 
nificent Ford coupes! Does he look 
peaceful? Perhaps, but you should hear 
the noise he can make with that horn 
of his. "Cheesie" is turning his foot- 
steps toward being a chemist. Although 
atoms and the material things of life (in- 
cluding women) attract him, we should 
like him to remember, "the light that lies 
in woman's eyes, and lies, and lies, and 
lies." 

College: Band (1, 2); Drum Corps (3). 
Class: Football (1, 2); Tug-o-war (1, 2). 




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NANCY MILLER ULRICH 

Lebanon, Pa. 

French Clionian 

"Elegant as simplicity and warm as 
ecstasy," 

Nancy is just as sweet and charming 
as her name. There is an elusive sug- 
gestion of fresh lilacs and cameo pins 
about her that, combined with her friend- 
ly disposition and ready sympathy, en- 
dears her to everyone. A conscientious 
worker and a good student, she is a liv- 
ing exponent of the maxim, "Business 
before pleasure." Yet she has her moods 
and her rather nervous, sensitive nature 
leads her not infrequently into the depths 
instead of into the clouds. Nancy's 
schedule is always a heavy one, even 
now that she has given up her work 
as one of Prof. Reynolds' capable as- 
sistants. Lucky are those who have be- 
come intimate with her for Nancy is a 
true friend. 

College : Assistant in Education (2, 3) ; 
Readers' Club (3); Eurydice (3); Class: 
Secretary (2); Basketball (1, 2); Society: 
Anniversary Program (2). 



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MILDRED CLARISSA UMHOLTZ 

Sacramento, Pa. 

Education Delphian 

"They are able because they think they 
are able." 
Who would have recognized the clever 
and fun-loving "Billie" Umholtz of today 
in the rather quiet and demure Mildred 
Umholtz of early freshman days? What 
or who has wrought this change? Well, 
we can at least partly account for the 
fine exam marks she makes. We hear 
that frequently just before she goes into 
an exam a telegram arrives from her 
dad wishing her luck and urging her on 
to successful efforts. We would wish 
that the resulting inspiration might be 
wider spread. "Lefty" is reputed as 

having bitten nicks in all the South Hall 
cups to better accommodate her left- 
handedness. "Billie" doesn't confine her 
interest to the gentlemen of her own 
class. Confiidentially we know that it 
extends to the Seniors and even to the 
Freshmen. That's perfectly all right, 
"Billie." Doesn't the Bible tell us to love 
our neighbor? 

Y. W. Pianist (3) . Society : Pianist 
(2); Warden (1); Treasurer (3). 



HOWARD ANDREW WENTZ 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

"He is never less at leisure, than when 
at leisure." 

This master of susquepedalian verb- 
age — whatever that means, has as his 
home port New Cumberland. To be 

born in this town and reared in the 
same place is the handicap with which 
he entered life. But to make mattters 
worse, he attended Harrisburg Tech, a 
handicap which in itself is too great for 
the most ordinary of men to overcome. 
However, his good nature over-balances 
this disadvantage and his good cheer 
has gained for him our forgiveness. 
"Hod" is another of the class athletes, 
being a prominent member of both var- 
sity baseball and football squads. He 
has a certain nerve and punch that stand 
him in good stead when in difficulty, and as 
a waiter — boys, he's a peach! Although he 
spends the least necessary amount of 
time on his books, he ranks fairly high 
in his classes and "he's a man's man 
for a' that.' 

College; Baseball (1, 2); Reserve Foot- 
ball (2) ; Varsity Football (3) ; "L" Club 
(1, 2, 3). Class: Football (1); Basket- 
ball (1, 2). 



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MAYNARD PALMER WILSON 
Verona, N. Y. 
History Kalozeiean 

"I am a man, and nothing that concerns 
a man do I deem a matter of indiffer- 
ence to me." 
"Five feet ten inches up, three feet 
around, with Ionic capital and decorative 
front windows," This would serve as 
an architect's description of "Chubby." 
He "blew in" from the Empire State and 
made for himself a host of friends. His 
philosophy is, "Take things easy," "don't 
stay up late at night and everything will 
work out all right." He is able to prac- 
tice his philosophy for he seems to get 
things with the minimum amount of 
effort. He not only ranks high as a stu- 
dent, but has represented both his class 
and school in various athletic events, 
thereby doing full justice to himself. 

"Chubby" has had some experience in 
teaching the three "R's.' With four years 
of training in college we are sure he 
will go out into the world a man of 
whom Lebanon Valley can justly be 
proud. 

College: Football (1, 2. 3); "L" Club 
(1, 2, 3); Band (1. 2). Class: President 
(1); Basketball (1, 2); Baseball (1); 
Sports Editor, Annual Staff (3) 



FLORENCE MABEL WOLFE 
Bernville, Pa. 
History Delphian 

"b/ie s just the quiet kind whose natures 
never vary." 
"Flo" isn't the kind that pushes her- 
self forward and in fact, being rather 
retiring doesn't reveal herself very much. 
We know that she studies quite faith- 
fully and has a very keen mind for 
mathematics. We though that "Flo" 

wasn't undulv interested in the opposite 
sex, but truth will out. When her "man 
from home" appeared on the scene, 
"Flo" so far forgot the rules of the 
college as to ride into Lebanon with him 
without permission. Oh, these quiet girls! 






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HILDA ELIZABETH WOLFERSBERGER 

Lebanon, Pa. 
English 

"The blush is beautiful, but it is some- 
•f^ times inconvenient." 

Last but not least is this attractive 
"five feet-two" of femininity. "Hilly" 

does not care about extra-curricular ac- 
tivities for herself but is, however, in- 
tensely interested in the medical career 
and the basketball achievements of a 
certain player. The young lady under 
discussion loves to talk — particularly 
about herself — and she has little diffi- 
culty in getting an audience, for she can 
talk about "nothing" in the most interest- 
ing way of anybody we ever knew. Her 
personality manifests itself in consider- 
able social activity in which card play- 
ing and dancing strive for supremacy. 
The laughter-loving nature of "Hilly" 
knows no limit; she can laugh at any- 
thing and anybody. Nothing, not even 
the study of music, which she has taken 
up again this year after a long vaca- 
tion, should be allowed to interfere with 
her plans for the ringing of wedding 
bells. 



RAYMOND EARL WOOD 

Trenton, N. J. 

History Kalosetean 

"Come what may come, 
Time and the hour run through the rough- 
est day." 

Gentle readers, behold the captain of 
the team! "Ray" hails from New Joisey, 
the state which is the finest in the Union 
(according to "Corkah"). He is one more 
of the Jerseyites whose athletic prowess 
has helped to make Lebanon Valley ath- 
letics far-famed. As a Freshman, he 
made his debut as a member of the 
Varsity football team. Since that time 
his work has been of such quality and 
his ability to lead so pronounced that his 
teammates have chosen him to lead them 
in their conquests on the gridiron next 
fall. 

Off the gridiron "Ray" is a happy-go- 
lucky chap whose gruff manners and ac- 
tions instill fear into even the boldest 
of the Frosh. However, those who are 
better acquainted with him know that 
under this veneer there is a different 
fellow, one who understands and appre- 
ciates his fellow mortals — even his room- 
mate, "Ben." 

College: Football (1, 2, 3); Reserve 
Basketball (2); "L" Club (1, 2, 3). 
Class: Basketball (1, 2); Baseball (1, 2); 
President (2). 



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SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 



RUDY CUNJACK 


President 


CALVIN KEENE 


M. BLANCHE COCHRAN 


Vice-Pres. 


MARY McCURDY 


MARY SHOWERS 


Secretary 


RUTH MARCH 


JAMES HAZELTON 


Treasurer 


HOMER ALLWEIN 




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Page Ninety 



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SopKomore Class Histon? 



ATE in September of the year nineteen hundred and twenty-six, 
there appeared in Annville approximately one hundred and twenty- 
five Freshmen, making up the largest Freshman class in the his- 
tory of the institution. This heterogeneous multitude of verdant 
Freshmen wore on their faces that touching expression of in- 
nocence and fright common to Freshmen the world over. In spite 
of this fact, the hike, on which the fair sex was well assured of the bravery 
and wit of their young gallants, was "pulled off" without any intervention by 
the prowling Sophs. 

There are some unpleasant memories of the Freshman year in regard 
to the class scrap and the tug-of-war, but these are all overshadowed by 
the football victory and the success of the banquet at the Harrisburg 
Country Club House during the Christmas holidays. 

With their second annual roll call in September, nineteen hundred and 
twenty-seven, they discovered that many of the comets of the Freshman 
year had sped clear of their little firmament, but that it was still resplendent 
with the glow of a goodly ruimber of their steady stars. Although the class 
of '30 was diminished in numbers it was increased in wisdom by the ex- 
periences of the former year. With the memories of Freshman days still 
vivid in their minds, they gladly assumed the Sophomorical responsibilities 
of enlightening their successors upon the spirit and traditions of Lebanon 
Valley College. This was partly accomplished by the observance of Fresh- 
man Week, which was introduced for the first time. 

Another dose of medicine to subdue the pride of the Freshmen was 
administered at the class scrap and tug-o-war. So equally matched was the 
strength of the two classes that they had to have a land pull in which the 
Sophomores held the rope without slipping for six minutes. 

The Freshmen held up their honor by defeating the "Sophs" in the 
inter-class football game. The Sophomores were unmolested on their hike 
but not undiscovered, for a few of the courageous "Frosh" who tried to 
break up the hike entertained their class enemies with songs and recita- 
tions. 

The class of '30, never losing sight of the real purpose of coming to 
college, looks forward with high hopes and eager expectations to the rest 
of her college days. 



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■^:.-^-:^:-^:-:^'->^-^'.>^:'>^^ 



r Sopnomore Class Roll 

ROY BISHOP ALBRIGHT, History Ephrata, Pa. 

:['.- Honors: — College: Bucknell (1); Basketball (2); Football (2j, Base- 

:•• ball (2); "L" Club (2). 

P 

ffC HOMER JOHN ALLWEIN, Business Administration, Kalozetean, 

'■}, Lebanon, Pa. 

;'/a Honors: — College: Football (1, 2). Society: Sergeant-at-Arms (2). 

:(P JOSEPH WITMER ALLWEIN, Chemistry, Kalozetean, . . Hummelstown, Pa. 

''^'' ESTHER ANGSTADT, English, CUonian Reading, Pa. 



:P 



Honors: — College: Writers' Club (2); Society: Chaplain (2). 



:iO ANNA APGAR, Biology, Delphian Lebanon, Pa. 

';^- Honors: — Eurydice (1, 2); W. S. G. A. (2); LaVie Staff (2); Debating 

■jh Team (1). Class: Y. W. Cabinet (1, 2). Society: Chaplain (2); Anni- 

versary Program (2). 

P 

MARY ELIZABETH AX, Latin, Delphian Lebanon, Pa. 

,1^ Honors: — College: Debating Team (1, 2). - 

'^ GLADYS FAE BACHMAN, History, Clionian Middletown, Pa. 7.' 

;,; Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2). Society: Pianist (2). v, 

:_ OSCAR BANKS BALDWIN, Chemistry, Kalozetean f^'- 

'■}. . Rutherford Heights, Pa. 

• 6^ Honors: — Class: Football (1). 

•P ALFRED CHARLES BARNHART, Business Admin., Kalozetean €j); 

./ Lebanon, Pa. 

■(p- Honors: — Class: Football Manager (1, 2). 

T. CLARENCE PAUL BARNHART, Mathematics, Philokosmian 
.-ic Hagerstown, Md. 



Honors: — College: Bugle Corps (2); Rifle Club (1); Reserve Basket- 
ball (1, 2). Class: Financial S 
Society: Sergeant-at-arms (1) 



:'/^ ball (1, 2). Class: Financial Secy. (1); Football (1, 2); Basketball (1) 



GLENN EMANUEL BENDIGO, Education, Philokosmian. ... Orwin, Pa. 
T' Honors: — College: Football (1, 2); Baseball (1); Class: Basketball (1). 

Page Ninety-three 



Sopnomore Class Roll 

(Continued) ' 

/■' 

ROSE ELIZABETH BOLLMAN, History, Clionian Lebanon, Pa. A. 

DOMINIC ANTHONY BOVINO, Biology, Philokosmian. . .Brooklyn, N. Y. A. 

Honors: — Class: Baseball (1). Society: Sergeant-at-arms (1). 

DOROTHY MARION BOYER, English, Delphian Arendtsville, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Goucher College (1); Readers' Club (2). 

MARY BLANCHE COCHRAN, Mathematics, Delphian Gap, Pa, 

Honors: — College: Basketball (1, 2); Ass't. Mgr. (2). Class: Vice-Pres. 
(2); Basketball (1, 2); Mgr. (1); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2). Society: 
Warden (1). 

RUTH GRACE COOPER; Enghsh, Dlphian Jamestown, N. Y. 

Honors: — College: W. S. G. A. (1); Cabinet (1, 2|, Pres. Freshman 
Commission (2); Student Volunteer (1, 2); Ministerium (1, 2); Sec- 
retary (1, 2); Delegate to International S. V. M. Conf. (2). Society; 
Chaplain (2). Class: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2), Pres. (1) ; Vice-Pres. (1). 

HELEN ELIZABETH COPENHAVER, French, CUonian . . Harisburg, Pa. ^•• 

RUDY JOSEPH CUNJAK, Pre-Medical, Philokosmian Steelton, Pa. ^■. 

Honors: — Colege : Football (1, 2); Senate (1, 2); Class: President (2); 
Basketball (1). 

JOHN LANDIS DEIMLER, Pre-Medical, Kalozetean .... Hummelstown, Pa. iiV 

CORINNE MARGARET DYNE, Latin, Clionian York, Pa. <ci); 

Honors: — College: Readers' Club (1); Eurydice (1, 2); Debating Team ■, , 

(1); Delegate to Eaglesmere (1). Society: Anniversary Program (1). Qj- 



CHARLES MONROE FINK, Mathematics, Kalozetean Annville, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Tennis (1). Class: Football (1); Basketball (1). 

JOSEPH RUSSELL FIORELLO, Chemistry, Kalozetean .. Trenton, N. J. 
Honors: — Class Tug-o-war (2); Baseball (1); Football (1). 

DOROTHY ISABELLA GABLE, Latin, Chonian Lebanon, Pa. 

ANNE GORDON, English, Clionian Trenton, N. J. 

Honors: — College: Readers' Club (2). 



Page Ninety-four 



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Sopnomore Class Roll <^': 

(Continued) ^^, 

DOLORES GREGORY, Biology, Clionian Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Honors :College ; C'ass: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2). 

KATHRYN HARRIET HAGNER, Biology, Delphian Reading, Pa. 

HELEN RETLEW HAIN, English Wernersville, Pa. 

HELEN MAE HAND, Mathematics, Delphian Pinegrove, Pa. 

Honors: — Society; Corr. Secy. (2) *-V; 

MARY LAVINNIA HARTZ, English, Clionian Annville, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2); Readers' Club (2); La Vie Staff 
(2). Society: Pianist (1). Class: Second Honor Student (2). 



ARTHUR ORVAL HAGER, Education Enhaut, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Baseball (1). Class: Football (1). 

JAMES CHARLES HAZELTON, Bible-Greek, Kalozetean . . Wibaux, Mont. 

Honors: — College: Ministerium (1, 2); Men's Senate (2); La Vie 

Staff (2) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2). Class: Tug-o-war (1, 2) ; Football (1) 

.; Financial Secy. (2). Society: Chaplain (1, 2); Judiciary Committee, 

>' Chairman (1); Anniversary Play (1); Anniversary Committe (1, 2); 

Editor of Examiner (2). 

MARION ELIZABETH HEAPS. Pre-Medical-Chemistery, Delphian 

Palmyra, Pa. 

LELAND STANFORD HEATH, History Trenton, N. J. 

.1 Honors: — College: Football (1,2). 

-.'■-"^ ANNA MARGUETTE HERSHEY, Enghsh, Chonian Hummelstown, Pa. 

HAROLD HEILMAN HERR, Mathematics, Kalozetean Palmyra, Pa. 

.'/C Honors: — Class: Football (1, 2). 

GEORGE EDGAR HERTZLER, Bible-Greek, Philokosmian 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Honors: — College: Band (1, 2); Tennis (1); Glee Club (1); Minister- 
ium (1, 2); Class: Basketball (1); Football (2); Tug-o-war (1, 2), 



h 



•■): 



4 

4 



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■x; DOROTHY ELIZABETH HIESTER, English, Delphian Lebanon, Pa. 

;'ftj Honors: — College: Eurydice (1); Debating Team (2). 



f\ 



Page Nuiety-five 






>":^';'^;"'^ 



SopKomore Class Roll c^ 

(Continued) \ 

t\ 

FRANK SCHUYLER HOFFMAN, Chemistry, Philokosmian .. Lebanon, Pa. 
Honors: — College: Glee Club (1), Class: Tug-o-war (1); Football (1). 

LUCILE ARLENE HORST, History, Clionian Annville, Pa. 

Honors: College: Basket Ball (2). Class: Basket Ball (1). 

ANNA ELIZABETH HOY, French, Delphian Millersburg, Pa. 

ELIZABETH DOROTHY HYLAND. English, Chonian Hershey, Pa. 

ROBERT WRIGHT JACKS, Mathematics, Philokosmian <^v'.' 

Hummelstown, Pa. 
Honors: — College: Glee Club (1). Class: Football (1, 2). Society: 
Pianist (1). 

LESTER M. KAUFFMAN, Bible-Greek, Kalozeatean Dover Pa. 

Honors: — College: Catawba College (1); Ministerium (2). Society: 
Corresponding Secretary (2). 

JAMES CALVIN KEENE, Bible-Greek, Philokosmian .... Pine Grove Pa. . '• 

Honors: — College: Glee Club (1, 2); Asst. Manager (2); May Day C3\'- 

Committee (1); Ministerium (1, 2); Treasurer (2); Star Course Com- • . 

mittee (1, 2) ; Bugle Corps (2) ; Rifle Club (1, 2). Class : Treasurer (2) ; -r^^' 
Tug-o-war (2); Basketball (1). Society: Sergeant-at-arms (1). 

GRACE ELIZABETH KEENER, Latin, Delphian Schaeflerstown, Pa. 

Honors:— Class: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2). 



ELEANOR MAE KISSINGER, Piano, Delphian Pine Grove, Pa 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2). 

GLADYS MARJORIE KNAUB, Latin, Clionian Mount Wolf, Pa 

Honors: — Society: Usher (1). Class: Basket Ball (1). 



HELEN JOSEPHINE MAGNIFICO, Enghsh, Delphian . . Philadelphia, Pa. A 

RUTH EVELYN MARCH, French, CUonian Harrisburg, Pa. . j 

.. Honors: — College: Eurydice (1); Basket Ball (2). Class: Basket 

:(p Ball (1, 2). f^-. 

MARY EMERSON McCURDY, Biology, Clionian Harrisburg, Pa. C^'; 

Honors:— College: La Vie Staff (2); Readers' Club (1, 2). Society: ■/.* 

' Usher (2). Class: Basket Ball (1). . "Q): 



^'■^:-^:.^:-^:-^:':^'--^>^i-^^^ 



Page S inety-six 



lYr. 



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!» 



Sophomore Class Roll 

(Continued) 

ELWOOD WILLIAM MEYERS. Chemistry, Philokosmian . . Dallastown. Pa. 
Honors: — Class; Tug-o-war (1, 2); Football (1, 2). 

LEAH ANNA MILLER, History, Clionian Germansville, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2). 



OLIVE MIRIAM MORROW, English, Clionian Duncannon, Pa. 

(t> Honors: — Society: Usher (1); Editor (2). Class: Basket Ball (1). 



MILDRED ELIZABETH MYERS, Latin, CUonian Annville, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2); Readers' Club (2). Class: Y. W. 
Cabinet (1, 2), Vice-Pres. (2). Society: Pianist (2). 

WILLIAM JACOB MYERS, Mathematics, Philokosmian . . Hagerstown, Md. 
Honors: — College: Asst. in Mathematics (2). Class: Baseball (1); Tug- 
o-war (2); Football (2). Society: Sergeant-at-arms (1). 



;■ CLARENCE IRWIN NOLL, Mathematics, Kalozetean Palmyra, Pa. 

•(u» Honors :— Class : Football (1, 2). 

■■V RICHARD HENRY ORTH, Mathematics, Kalozetean Lebanon, Pa. 

X,s. Honors: — Class: Foootball (2). 

■y 

:(fc» RUTH ELIZABETH PARNELL, French, CHonian MinersviUe, Pa. 



IRENE BACHMAN PETER, History, CUonian Allentown, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2). 



MARY ELIZABETH RANK, French, Clionian Annville, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (2). 

LOUIS ALBERT RENNINGER, Chemistry, Kalozetean . . Robesonia, Pa. 

GEORGE FREDERICK RHOADS, History, Kalozetean Highspire, Pa. 

Honors: — Class; Tug-o-war (1,2). Football (1, 2). 

ELVA MAE RIEGEL, English, Delphian Lebanon, Pa. 



«?: 



Page Ainety-sfven 



Sopnomore Class Roll 

(Continued) 

MADELINE ANNA RIFE, Latin, Clionian Chambersburg, Pa. r 

Honors: — College Readers' Club (1, 2); Eurydice (1, 2); Y. W, C. A. 
Cabinet (2); May Day Committee (1); Delegate to Eaglesmere (1). C'J; 

Society: Chaplain (1); Judiciary Committee (2); Anniversary Com- 
mittee (2). Class: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2). 

JOHN ROBERT ROJAHN, Pre-Medical, Phiokosmian .... Dallastown, Pa, 
Honors: — Class: Football (1, 2). 

MILDRED HARRISON SAYLOR, Biology, Clionian York, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2). Society: Usher (2). 

JOSEPHINE MAE SCHELL, History, Delphian Mt. Aetna, Pa. 

Honors: — Society: Warden (2). 

PAULINE LEHMAN SHAEFFER, Enghsh, Clionian Millersburg, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Readers' Club (2). Society: Usher (1). Class: Y. W. 
Cabinet (2). 

MARY ELIZABETH SHOWERS, French, Clionian Annville, Pa. V. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2'); Class: Basket Ball (1); Secre- *7..' 

tary (2). ^._ 

CYRUS ALFRED SHENK, History, Kalozetean Annville, Pa. 

Honors: — Class: Financial Secretary (1); Baseball (1). 

ALVIN EDGAR SHROYER, Mathematics, Kalozetean Annville, Pa. '^■j. 

Honors: — Glee Club (1); Basketball (1, 2); Tennis (1); Faculty- V. 

» Student Committee (1). Class: President (1); Football (1, 2); Basket- <Jj- 
La.l (i); Baseball (1); Tug-o-war (1, 2). 

HENRY TONKIN SILBERMAN, Pre-Medical, Kalozetean . . Lebanon, Pa. 

ALBERT LEROY SITLINGER, Bible-Greek, Philokosmian . . Lykens, Pa. 
Honors: — College: Ministerium (1, 2); Bugle Corps (2). Class: Base- 
ball ( 1 ); Football (2). Society: Sergeant-at-arms ( 1 ) ; Cor. Secretary (2). 

~^: 

PALMER MILLARD SLENKER, Bible-Greek, Philokosmian Yoe, Pa. ';■_ 

;(P Honors: — College: Ministerium (1, 2). *5)' 

lip MARY ALCESTA SLIGHTER, Music, Clionian Lancaster, Pa. 

•X* Honors: — College: Readers' Club (1, 2); Eurydice (1, 2). Society 

"^ Pianist (1). 

Page Nincty-eighl 






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■■■: Sophomore Class Roll 

.'(Vjj (Continued) 

• (f> MARGARET SMYSER, English, Clionian York, Pa. 

.'fe ELIAS OSCAR SNEATH, Bible-Greek, Philokosmian Millersville, Pa. 

,'.^ Honors: — College: Ministerium (1, 2). Class: Football (2). Society: 

:ft> Sergeant-at-arms (1); Chaplain (1). 



JOHN WILLIAM SNYDER, Mathematics, Philokosmian . . . Lykens, Pa. 
Honors: — Class: Baseball (1); Tug-o-war (2). Society: Sergeant-at- 
arms (1) ; Editor (2). 

MARY LEAH SNYDER, Education, Delphian Avon, Pa. 

BERNITA SHECKARD STREBIG, History, Delphian Reading, Pa. 

CLARA G. SWANK, Organ, Delphian Mt. Crawford, Va. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (2). 

MICHAEL TARANTO, Chemistry-Biology, Kalozetean Linden, N. J. 

Honors: — Society: Sergeant-at-arms (1). 

FOSTER GROSH ULRICH, History, Kalozetean Palmyra, Pa. 

Honors: — Class: Football (1). Society: Assistant to Treasurer (2). 



NORMAN VANDERWALL, English, Kalozetean Linden, N. J. 

Honors: — Class: Tug-o-war (1, 2); Football (2). Society: Anniversary 
'/a Play (1); Corresponding Secretary (2); Sergeant-at-arms (1). 

;fb LLOYD M. WEBER, Chemistry, Philokosmian Blue Ball, Pa. 

' , • Honors: — Class: Tug-o-war (1, 2); Football (1). 



OLIVE MARIE WEIGEL, Piano, Delphian Johnstown, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2); Society: Pianist (2). Class: Basket 

Ball (Tj. 

MARY ELLEN WITMER, EngHsh, CHonian Mountville, Pa. 

JOSEPHINE HARRIET YAKE, French, Clionian Lebanon, Pa. 

Honors: — College: Eurydice (1, 2). 

SAMUEL T. ZAPPIA, Mathematics, Philokosmian Brocklton, N. Y. 

Honors: — College: Football (1, 2); Baseball (1). Class: Basketball (1). 



€jA: 






Page Ninety-nine 



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Pat/e One Hundred One 



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FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 



First Semester 
ROBERT ROUDABUSH 
CAROLINE FISHER 
DOROTHY ELDRIDGE 
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON 



President 
Vice-Pres. 
Secretary 
Treasurer 




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Second Semester 
KENNETH RUSSELL 
ELIZABETH ENGLE 
MADELINE SHEDDY 
CATHERINE BOWERS 



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FrosK Class Roll 4 

Joseph William Abraham Trenton, N. J. f- 

Amy Sara Achenbach Lebanon, Pa. JK'. 

Clyde Frederick Ainsworth Mechanicsburg, Pa. v' 

Sara E. Auman Palymra, Pa, t'lV 

Lillian Luella Barber Easton, Pa, 'j.'. 

George John Becker Weehawkin, N, J, *y} 

Harold Kreiger Becker Annville, Pa. ^• 

Henry David Berkov Lebanon, Pa, ^f 

Alma Mary Binner Rexmont, Pa, if)]; 

Katharine Viola Bowers York, Pa, ':■ 

John A, Brieger Trenton, N, J. *y_.' 

Melvin Ebersole Burkholder Lebanon, Pa. 

Frederick Carl Casteglio Harrisburg, Pa, 

Samuel Fred Christman Williamson, Pa, ^; 

Lloyd Alvin Daub Muir, Pa. • .;' 

Edna Mae Early Palmyra, Pa. CjJ; 

Marie Marguerite Ehrgott Lebanon, Pa, jli 

Dorothy Rebecca Eldridge Myersville, Md. Si- 
Mary Elizabeth Engle Palmyra, Pa. ^■ 

Sara Louise Ensminger Red Lion, Pa. . ■'/ 

Russel Emerich Etter Hummelstown, Pa, O)' 

Caroline Large Fisher Worcester, Mass. • '. 

Alice Anna Forman Wisconisco, Pa. V).' 

Earl Bachman Frey Lebanon, Pa. "V. 

Raphael Ammon Gingrich Lebanon, Pa. 7.' 

Alexander Douglass Grant Toms River, N. J. ^'^ 

Norman Shirk Greener Lebanon, Pa. /7' 

Agnes Clara Haertter Shamokin, Pa. Qj"; 

Dorothy Blanche Hafer Glenside, Pa. ' ^ 

Henry Ray Harris Clarence Center, N. Y. ^.■ 

Ethel Mar Hower Lebanon, Pa. X. 

H. Hov^rard Hoy, Jr Millersburg, Pa. 7r' 

Joseph Brandt Hutchinson New Cumberland, Pa, ^■. 

Chester Johnson Island Heights, N. J. ,.' 

Harry Melvin Keckler Palmyra, Pa. CJ); 

Joseph Harper Kleinfelter Palmyra, Pa, v^. 

Peter Harry Kralick Mount Carmel, Pa, *J); 

Ruth Stump Krout Spry, Pa, "V- 

Warren Ellsworth Lebo HaUfax, Pa, X-' 

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[(^ FrosK Class Roll 

■'i (Continued) 

Anna Ruth Leidich Shaefferstown, Pa. 

.i,' EfRe Ruth LeVan Catawissa, Pa, ^ 

:'a Artz Samuel Lick Lebanon, Pa. 

"'. Margaret Ethel Light. . .Lebanon, Pa. 

Ruth Irene Liller Hershey, Pa, 

Allison Joseph Mayhew, Jr Lemoyne, Pa. 

' Edgar William Meiser Lebanon, Pa. 

7^ Albert Woodrow Miller Millersburg, Pa, 

''>T Grant Nathaniel Miller Orwin, Pa. 

■ (3 John Franklin Miller Lebanon, Pa. 

'.•. Russell Evan Morgan Minersville, Pa. 

■j^ Violet May Morton Elmwood, Pa. 

-V Grant Emerson Parsons Lebanon, Pa. 

".\ Lawrence Hewey Paul Lykens, Pa. ' 

;/L William Edward Pleiss Annville, Pa. 

"■>, John Herr Rank Annville, Pa. 

''((i Hylton H. Reber Palmyra ,Pa. 

_'. . • Daniel Grube Reiber Lebanon, Pa. 

'.(P* Robert Lee Roudabush Minersville, Pa. 

Kenneth Lyman Russell Youngsville, Pa. 

Charles Dean (Salada Lykens, Pa. 

Rading Winton Schanbacker Lebanon, Pa. ^.. 

Madeleine Helen Sheddy Youngsville, Pa. 

.\ti Charles Joseph Suavely Annville, Pa. <; 

'.■ • Simon Floyd Snyder Lebanon, Pa. 

•W-* William Gilbert Spangler Harrisburg, Pa. *^' 

.V* Mary Elizabeth Stager Lebanon, Pa. "i 

'.P Mildred Elsie Stauflfer Atlantic City, N. J. ^ 

(tb William Howard Tetter Newark, N. J. 

'•>. Dorothy Caroline Thompson Southboro, Mass. , . 

:|p Willard Trezise Minersville, Pa. <C^i 

'■■• Harold Edward Watkins Goodspring, Pa. •■ 

^Q> Herbert Mark Morgan Welker Lykens, Pa, ' 

;, ' Charles Henry Wise Lykens, Pa, 

,C Earl Emerson Wolf Lancaster, Pa, 

/^,. Anna Mabel Wolfe Lebanon, Pa. , 

Joseph Edward Wood Trenton, N.J. 

Margaret Helen Young Lebanon, Pa, 



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Pa^f On? Hundred Se-ven 






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SENIORS 

GRACE ELIZABETH DANIEL 

Minersville, Pa. 

Piano Clionian 

College: Eurydice Club (1, 2, 4), Business Manager (4), Accompanist (2, 4). Class: 
Asst. Treas. (1); Freshman Y, W. C. A. Cabinet (1), Society: Pianist (1); Anniversary 
Program (1, 2, 4); Usher (2); Vice-Pres. (4); Judiciary Committee (4), 

JUNIORS • 

ALYCE MAGDYLON WOY 
Johnstown, Pa. 
Piano Delphian 

"Give me some Music; music, melody, moody food 
Of us that trade in love". 
Gay, tempestous, tempermental Alyce ! With her variety of moods she was never a 
bore but always an interesting, "living" companion. With characteristic disregard for 
such petty things as rules and regulations, she always began her vacations a week before 
anyone else and prolonged them another full week after all good little girls were 
back in their collegiate cages. The Muses were espcially kind to Alyce for they gave 
her an enviable musical talent as well as a skill for doing all dainty handiwork — the 
creation of gowns and the skillful making and embroidering of them. As a busy Con- 
servatory stude Alyce didn't have time for many extra-curricular activities. 

What her two roomies would have done without her wall decorations, gentle tone of 
self-expression and other contributions is a thing for conjecture. Suffice to say that 
wherever she goes she will probably continue to please her acquaintances with true Alysian 
charm. 

College: Eurydice (1, 2). Class: Asst, Treas. (1). Society: Pianist (1); Anniversary 
Program (1). 

SOPHOMORES 

Hilda Irene Hess Piano Clara Gertrude Swank Organ 

Eleanor Mae Kissinger Piano Olive Marie Weigel Piano 

FRESHMEN 

Amy Auchenbauch Piano Alcesta Slichter Piano-Violin 

Agnes Haertter Voice Margaret Young Organ 



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Apgar, Anna Boyer 
Auchenbach, Amy 
Bcattie, John W. 
Becker, Merle 
Bixler, Ralph E. 
Bowman, Hilda E. 
Burrier, Benetta 
Butterwick, Anna E. 
Butterwick, Helen I. 
Carrender, Gladys 
Clay, Mildred E. 
Daniel, Grace E. 
Deibler, John B. 
Eddy, Helen 
Evans, Christine 
Gingrich, Carl 
Gingrich, June 
Gossard, Mary 
Grant, Alexander D. 
Grumbine, May S. 
Haas, Mildred 
Haertter, Agnes 
Hafer, Dorothy 
Haldeman, Dorothy 



Conservatory Roll 

Harkins, Geraldine 
Harpel, Leah 
Hartz, Mary L, 
Hess, Hilda I, 
James, Doris 
Kettering, Claire 
Kettering, Ruth M. 
Kissinger, Eleanor M. 
Klinger, Allen E. 
Knoll, Robert W. 
Kreider, Helen 
Kunkel, Orville 
Lebo, Warren E. 
LeVan, Efifie 
Light, J. Mark 
Lohr, Myra 
Longnecker, Helen 
March, Ruth 
Miller, Florence 
Miller, Leah A. 
Mills, Mary G. 
Mullin, Mrs. Michael 
Mumma, Anna 
Murr, Myrtle 



Myers, Mildred E. 
Oyer, Miriam R. 
Oyer, Russell C. 
Peter, Irene B. 
Rearick, Alice 
Rearick, Luther M. 
Sheddy, Madeleine 
Sherk, Ralph 
Shroyer, A. Edgar 
Slichter, Alcesta 
Sneath, Oscar 
Spatz, Nelda 
Strebig, Bernita S. 
Strubhar, Ruth A. 
Swank, Clara G. 
Turby, Myrle 
Wanger, Gladys C. 
Walter, Violet P. 
Weigel, Olive M. 
Wolf, Earl E, 
Wolf, Viola M. 
Wolfersberger, Hilda E. 
Yake, Harriet J. 
Young, Margaret 



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Men's Glee Club 



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OFFICERS 

Musical Director Prof. Alexander Crawford 

President J . Bruce Behney 

Vice-President Jacob M. Horst 

Secretary C. Lanston Mentzer 

Treasurer Russell C. Oyer 

Business Manager O. Pass Bollinger 

Pianist Jacob M. Horst 



PERSONNEL 



First Tenors 
John W. Beattie 
Russell C. Oyer 
David J. Edmunds 
Kenneth L. Russell 

Second Tenors 
Forrest W. Miller 
E. Oscar Sneath 
Walter D. Pugh 
Russell E. Morgan 



First Basses 
O. Pass Bollinger 
Harold C. Rider 
Allen E. Klinger 
J. Calvin Keene 

Second Basses 
J. Bruce Behney 
Luther M. Rearick 
C. Lanston Mentzer 
H. Wesley Carpenter 



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Lykens 
Tower City 
Valley View 
Pine Grove 
Waynesboro 
New Cumberland 



ITINERARY 

Greencastle 
Red Lion 
Baltimore 
Washington 
Harrisburg 



Reading 

Shillington 

Palmyra 

Lebanon 

Shamokin 

Millersburg 



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Page One Hundred Eleven 



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Program 



Alma Mater Arranged \- 

The Lost Chord Sullivan /■ 

Sanctus Moir _y. 

GLEE CLUB 



An Encounter with an Interviewer Mark Twain 

MR. BEHNEY AND MR. BEATTIE 

Quartette Selected 

MR. OYER MR, RIDER 

MR. RUSSELL MR. MENTZER 



A Girl to Order Bessie Wreford Springer 

A Comedy in One Act 
The cast : 



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Ftiffc One Hundred Tivelve 



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The Bells of St. Mary's Adams 

Haste to the Bower of Robin Hood Moffat 

The Hunter's Farewell Mendelssohn ryi; 

/■ 
GLEE CLUB 

Polish Dance Scharwenka /.■ 

MR. HORST C^';. 

INTERMISSION a]',. 

To the Spirit of Music Stephens c:^; 

Murmuring Zephyrs Jensen 

GLEE CLUB 



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ft> Dudley "Dud" Elliott, a senior Mr. Oyer 

; • Howard "Lady" Clayton, a junior Mr. Bollinger 

jf* Fred "Puck" Evans, also a junior Mr. Beattie Q\: 

Earl "Biscuits" Nelson, a sophomore Mr. Morgan 

Mr. Elliott, "Dud's" father Mr. Behney <^J': 

Elsie Jordan, "Dud's" fiancee Mr. Russell 

Bass solo ■ • Selected 

MR. CARPENTER 

The Blind Ploughman Clark f^'. 

The Lamp in the West Parker ■ ^ 

Wanderer's Night Song • • Lenz ?" ^ 

GLEE CLUB 



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Pfli7^ On*" Hundred Thirteen 



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Eurydice Choral Club 



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OFFICERS 

Musical Director Ruth Engle 

Pianist Grace Daniel 

President Benneta Burrier 

Vice-President Irene Schell 

Secretary-Treasurer Ruth Strubhar 

Business Manager ■ ■ Grace Daniel 



PERSONNEL 



First Sopranos 





Benneta Burrier 


Corinne Dyne 


Mary Hartz 






Nelda Spatz 


Leah Miller 
Second Sopranos 


Agnes Haertter 






Mildred Myers 


Alcesta Slichter 


Mary Showers 




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Mary Rank 


Mildred Saylor 


Olive Weigel 




Madehne Rife 




Caroline Fisher 




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First Altos 




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Mae Burkholder 


Florence Miller 


Fae Bachman 


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Irene Schell 


Ruth Strubhar 


Eleanor Kissinger 


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Miriam Hershey 


Nancy Ulrich 
Second Altos 


Irene Peter 


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Anna Apgar 


Hilda Hess 


Katherine Bowers 


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Viola Wolf 


Josephine Yake 


Dorothy Hafer 


















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Piiqe One Hundred Fourteen 






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Part I 

Salutation Gaines 

THE CLUB 

Solo Selected 

'.h NELDA SPATZ 

■ r 

' ■ Sumer is Icumen in 13th Century — arranged by Deems Taylor 

Abode of Love 18th Century — arranged by Ferrare 

Whistle, My Lad air by Bruce— arranged by Taylor 

THE CLUB 



"S 



Reading 

Seraphic Song Rubinstein — paraphrase by Gaines 

CONTRALTO SOLO VIOLIN OBLIGATO AND CLUB 



Part II 

Quartette — Lullaby Demire 

MISSES MILLER, FISHER, BACHMAN AND HESS 

Beau Soir (Solo — Miss Burrier) Debrassy 

The Mind Cecil Forsyth 

Rain Curran 

Deep River arranged by Clifford Page 

THE CLUB 

Sketch 

English Folk Song — May Day Carol arranged by Deems Taylor 

Valse Arietta Deems Taylor 



P Program *^/ 



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Page One Hundred Fifteen 



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/'a^/*' 0«r Hundred Sixteen 



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/'oi/r 0«f Hundred Seventeen 



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/'rt^^" On^ Hundred Eighteen 






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Pn^i' On^ Hundred Nineteen 



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■(L> Clionian Literary? Societ}) 

•(t* First Term Officers Second Term 

'''^, Mabel Hafer President Ruby Ann See 

Alice Kindt Vice-President Grace Daniel '■ 

. iVj Anna Mark Rec. Secy Jane Fearnow 

•^ . Emma Shaeflfer Corr. Secy Kathryn Bork 

:/r> Elsie Reider Treasurer Elsie Reider 

Eleanor Snoke Critic Olga Freeman 

■ Ifj Mildred Myers Pianist Fae Bachman 

.. • Ruby Ann See Chaplain Esther Angstadt 

(p Miriam Muth Editor Olive Morrow t^- 



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MOTTO 
"Virtute et Fide" 

COLORS 
Gold and White 

YELL— 

Cleo! Clio! Rah, Rah! Rah! 
Rco! Rio! Sis! Boom! Bah! 






Page One Hundred Twenty 





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Pai/e One Hundred Twenty-one 






Clionian Literary Society 




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HE Clionian Literary Society, the oldest girls' society on the campus, 
celebrates its fifty-seventh anniversary this year. Clio has grown 
from an organization of a few worthy and zealous girls with a 
goal in view to a large society of loyal, accomplished girls who have 
not only reached the goal set by their sisters, but whose achieve- 
ments have far surpassed it. 

Each year Clio adds to her membership a number of the talented new 
girls. The society has the honor of having on her roll a large number of 
the ladies of the faculty and the wives of the professors. Every Clionian 
deems it an honor and a privilege to be enrolled in the Clionian Literary 
Society. 

Then there is Minerva, Clio's goddess, who continually watches over her 
and guides her to more lofty ideals. Every member of Clio bows to Minerva 
and ever strives to answer her call. . '•' 

Although Clio is known as a literary society, do not think that the soci- *''■ 
ety is interested only in the literary world. She never neglects the social 

features of campus life. Any Clionian will testify to the good times all enjoy ' /' 

at the joint sessions held with her sister society, Delphian, and the two ^• 

mens' societies on the campus. ;■ 

This is not the best that can be said of Clio. Her achievements have qJJ 
been many, but she looks forward with eagerness to the future. Her suc- 
cess in the past serves as an impetus to the attainment of all that is worthy 

and right in the future. She hopes to make this year the best year of all _v. 

and to continually press forward, ever raising the standard of the Clionian *y. 

Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College. J^. 

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fage One Hundred Tiienty-tico 



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Clionian Roll 



Benetta Burrier 


Ruth Essick 


Edith Light 




Catherine Craven 


Jane Fearnow 


Mary McCurdy 




Olga Freeman 


Leah Harpel 


Leah Miller 




Mary Geyer 


Miriam Hershey 


Olive Morrow 




Edna Graham 


Ruth Light 


Mildred Myers 




Mabel Hafer 


Marion Hoffman 


Ruth Parnell 




Gladys Happel 


Florence Miller 


Irene Peter 




Bernice Hoover 


Irene Miller 


Mary Rank 


fc... 


Alice Kindt 


Miriam Muth ' 


Madeline Rife 




Anna Mark 


Ruth Reigle 


Mildred Saylor 




Emma Meyer 


Emma Schaeffer 


Pauline Schaeffer 




Elsie Reider 


Nancy Ulrich 


Mary Showers 




Ruby Ann See 


Fae Bachman 


Alcesta Schlictcr 




Eleanor Snoke 


Rose Bollman 


Margaret Smyser 




Nelda Spatz 


Helen Copenhaver 


Mary Ellen Witmer 




Hazel Bailey 


Corinne Dyne 


Josephine Yake 


^^ 


Fredericka Baker 


Dorothy Gable 


Esther Angstadt 




Mary Bender 


Anne Gordon 


Alma Binner : 


tf",' 


Elizabeth Black 


Mary Hartz 


Edna Early 




Kathryn Bork 


Anna Hershey 


Dorothy Eldridge 




Carol Brinser 


Hilda Hess 


Alice Foreman 




Mae Burkholder 


Lucile Horst 


Dolores Gregory ' 




Mary Clymer 


Dorothy Hyland 


Margaret Light 




Grace Daniel 


Gladys Knaub 


Mary Stager ; 


d] 




Mabel Brewbaker 




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Page One Hundred Twenty-three 



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Delpnian Literary Society) ^ 

First Term Officers Second Term Jk. 

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Frances Long President Sara Lou Rose 

Frances Hammond Vice-President Edna Lang 

Mildred Lane Rec. Secy Mae Hamer 

Helen Hand Ccrr. Secy Mildred Lane 

Mildred Umholtz Treasurer Mildred Umholtz 

Sara Lou Rose Critic Ruth Strubhar 

Alyce Woy Pianist Olive Weigle 

Ruth Cooper Chaplain Anna Apgar 

Josephine Schell Warden Madeline Sheddy JK. 



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Racka-Chacka ! Racka-Chacka ! Racka-Chacka-Chow ! •'• 

Jj Booma-Lacka! Booma-Lacka! Booma-Lacka-Bow ! Cj|' 

■ ' Racka-Chacka! Booma-Lacka! Wow, Wow, Wow! V- 

')* Delphian! Delphian! Delphian! ^: 

\ *|; 

Puye One Hundred T'lcenty-four 



MOTTO 
"Know Thyself" 

COLORS 
Scarlet and Gold 

FLOWER 
Poppy 

YELL 



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Prt(7f One Hundred Tv:enty-five 



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Delphian Literary Society 



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A valeur n'attend pas le nombre des annees", Corneille wrote. If 
value were dependent upon age, Delphian would be of little import- 
ance on our campus; but not so. Just six years in February, a 
group of noble girls, seeking the best for their Alma Mater, unself- 
ishly left their well-organized literary society and oflFered themselves 
as pioneers in the service of Delphian. It was indeed a small be- 
ginning, but with their hearts bound together by a common spirit of love 
and sincere service, it flourished. They blazed the way and we of the present 
only strive for worthiness to follow, 

"Know thyself" is the admonition of Delphian to every girl who enters 
her portals. In truth, self-knowledge is a pre-requisite to the attainment of 
the best in life, and can be gained only through self-expression, Delphia 
offers to every Delphian the opportunity of expressing herself in her own 
way, be it through music, dramatics, public speaking, poetry or other literary 
composition, thus seeking out and developing latent talent. 

Since the aim of Delphian is to prepare girls to live to the full every 
phase of life, she has also thrown open the doors of privilege to the acquir- 
ing of a broader cultural back-through a study of the classics, both musical 
and literary; to the physical development through athletics; to social enjoy- 
ment through continued pleasant association in the regular meetings and in 
joint sessions with brother and sister societies. 

May Delphian be blessed every year by as great a gift of talent as has 
been her's this year, and may she send out into the world an ever increasing 
number of loyal subjects who are better for her influence. 

Here's to the scarlet and gold 
Here's to the sign of the poppy. 



Page One fiinidred Twenty-six 



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Delphian Roll 



Marian Dorsheimer 


Mildred Umholtz 


Mary Snyder 


1 


Esther Flickinger 


Edna Lang 


Clara Swank 


Kathryn Flinchbaugh 


Esther Kauflfman 


Olive Wiegle 


Frances Long 


Anna Apgar 


Amy Achenbach 


1 


Deborah Orth 


Mary Ax 


Sara Auman 


4 
4:- 


Helen Paine 


Blanche Cochran 


Lillian Barber 


Sara Lou Rose 


Dorothy Boyer 


Karthryn Bowers 


Irene Schell 


Ruth Cooper 


Mary Elizabeth Engle 


A: 


Viola Wolfe 


Marion Heaps 


Sara Ensminger 




Edna Gorski 


Elizabeth Hoy 


Caroline Fisher 




Mae Hamer 


Dorothy Heister 


Agnes Haerttcr 


/.' 


Dorothy Kleinfelter 


Helen Hand 


Dorothy Hafer 


4 
'4 


Mildred Lane 


Katherine Hagner 


Ruth Krout 


Janet Miller 


Grace Keener 


Anna Leidich 


Ehzabeth Matthes 


Eleanor Kissinger 


Effie Le Van 


h 


Irene Schrope 


Helen Magnilico 


Ruth Liller 


4 


Fannie Silber 


Ruth March 


Violet Morton 


Ruth Strubhar 


Elva Mae Reigle 


Madeline Sheddy 


4 


Alyce Woy 


Bernita Strebig 


Dorothy Thompson 


4 
4 


Florence Wolfe 


Josephine Schell 


Anna, Wolfe 


Ruth Waggoner 




Margaret Young 



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Page One Hundred Twenty-seven 



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Kalozetean Literary Society 



MOTTO 
"Palma non sine Pulvere" 

COLORS 
Red and Old Gold 

YELL 

Wah Hoo! Wah Hoo ! Wah Hoo! Ree ! 

Palma non sine Pulvere ! 
Wah Hoo! Wah Hco! Wah Hoo! Ree! 



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First Term Officers Second Term 

Walter Waggoner President Roy Flook 0; 

Lawrence Derickson .... Vice-pres L. Archie Lutz 

L. Archie Lutz Ree. Secy Andrew Laurie 

Norman Vanderwall .... Corr. Secy Lester Kauflman 

H. Darkes Albright .... Critic Carl Heilman 

James Hazleton Chaplain Grant Miller 

Homer Allwein Serg.-at-arms Kenneth Russell 

C. Donald Eberly Editor James Hazleton 

Miles Kiehner Pianist Orville Kunkel 

Harry Hovis Treasurer Harry Hovis (V)', 

Roy Flook Ch. Jud. Ccmmittes Lawrence Derickson . • 

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Page One Hundred T'lienly-eight 



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Page One Hundred Tnventy-nine 



Kalozetean Literary) Societ)) 






ACH decade there are some five hundred million souls who, coming 
to their journey's end, disappear forever into the dim and the dusk 
of the eternity vi'hich we call the past. Of this great multitude there 
are a very few who are remembered beyond their own generation. 
These few are immortals largely because they lived noble, useful 
lives. Kalo does not issue guarantees of fame, but she does make 

a great and lasting impression for the better in the lives of her men. By her 

ideals she helps her members to be useful and happy. 

Through all time there have been a few eternal and constant human 
values, Kalo has availed herself of these as practical ideals to follow. The 
two ideals of culture and fellowship have been pre-eminent in Kalo's fifty- 
one years of usefulness. There are scores of her members, in the practical 
realities of life, who are achieving noble purposes ; and there are other 
scores who have left the world better than they found it. The lives of these 
men are enduring testimony to the manner in which Kalo ha.', been living her 
ideals. 

By culture Kalo means the appreciation of the finest things of civilization. 
In the literary sessions of Kalo every phase of life is presented and discussed. 
Music, art, literature, religion, science, politics, philosophy, and many other 
angles of our complex life have their place so that by the variety of her 
cultural programs Kalo endeavors to lead her members to greater freeness of 
thought and broad-mindedness, counteracting the narrowing influence of 
specialized curricular studies. 

By fellowship Kalo means friendship deeper and greater than a 
brother's. Kalo's fellowship means man to man joys with all the formalities 
and vanities cast aside and forgotten. Her fellowship means a jolly good time. 
And it also means the bonds of deep and abiding friendships that stand tried 
and true adown the years and to the end of life. 

As the years pass by, our college will go through many changing periods. 
Our Alma Mater is bound to grow and keep on improving, Kalo shall grow 
with the college, and with the growth, the changes, and the other things that 
may come and go we believe that Kalo shall maintain, from year to year and 
from generation to generation, these two practical ideals of culture and 
fellowship. 



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Page One Hundred Thirty 



a:^:C^ 



Kalozetean Roll 






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Joseph Bruno 
O. P. Bollinger 
Henry Brubaker 
Adam Dundore 
Paul Elberti 
Roy Flook 
Darkes Albright 
B, L. Hammond 
Raymond Koch 
Paul Piersol 
Carl Rojahn 
Clifford Singley 
Richard Snyder 
George Snyder 
Walter Waggoner 
Kenneth Stuckey 
Henry Aungst 
Russel Becktel 
William Blatt 
Domminic Calabrese 
Arba Disney 
Lawrence Derickson 
Enos Detweiler 
Ear! Donmoyer 
Donald Eberly 
William Emenheiser 
Carl Heilman 
Harry Ho vis 
Miles Kiehner 
Archie Lutz 
Lanston Mentzer 
Joseph Hutchison 



Palmer Poff 
Maynard Wilson 
Raymond Wood 
Frederick Miller 
Raymond Kuhnert 
R. Daubert 
Frank Gaciofano 
Russel Stuckey 
Martin Bleichart 
Charles Troutman 
Floyd Whisler 
Stanley Piela 
Wayne Sparrow- 
Howard Wentz 
Forrest Miller 
Foster Ulrich 
Clarence Noll 
Frederick Rhoads 
Alfred Shenk 
Norman Vanderwall 
Henry Silberman 
Harold Herr 
M. Taranto 
Edgar Shroyer 
Alfred Barnhart 
Homer AUwein 
James Hazelton 
Landis Deimler 
Lloyd Lux 
David Edmunds 
Robert Roudabush 
Wesley Carpenter 



Edgar Meiser 
Frank Miller 
Daniel Reiber 
Hylton Reber 
Peter Kralich 
Willard Trezise 
Russel Morgan 
Harold Becker 
Kenneth Russell 
Joseph Kleinfelter 
George Becker 
Gilbert Spangler 
Russel Ebersole 
John Brieger 
Melvin Keckler 
Wayne Light 
Henry Berkov 
Melvin Burkholder 
Norman Greiner 
Lester Kauffman 
Andrew Laurie 
William Tetter 
Allison Mayhew 
Grant Miller 
Dean Salada 
William Pleiss 
Orvillc Kunkle 
Myrl Brown 
Earl Frey 
Charles Suavely 
V. Shanbacker 
Clyde Ainsworth 



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Page One Hundred Thirty-one 






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PKilokosmian Literary Society ^ 

First Term Officers Second Term 

Elmer Keiser President Harvey Nitrauer 

Samuel Meyer Vice-Pres Luther Rearick 

John Beattie Rec. Secy William Meyers 

Uhl Kuhn Corr. Secy Francis Barr 

J. Bruce Behney Critic Charles Gelbert ^ 

Arnold Zwally Judge Samuel Meyer 

ji5 Henry Kohler Chaplain Calvin Keene ^■ 

Walter Pugh Editor John Snyder 

_ -' Harold Rider Pianist Jacob Horst C 

v' Milford Knisley Ch. Ex. Comm Harold Rider 

.i,'^ Albert Sitlinger Ser.-at-arms Harold Watkins *- 



C 



■\^ MOTTO *^\! 

• S: "Esse Quam Videri" CS' 

COLORS 
' Old Gold and Navy Blue 

YELL 

Hobble gobble, razzle dazzle L, V. C. 

"Esse Quam Videri". Cfj 

V Hobble gobble, razzle dazzle, sis, boom bah! 

Philokosmian ! Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



Page One Hundred Tliirty-U:o 



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Paffe One Hundred Tliirty-tliree 



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PKilokosmian Literary Society 




HILO is now completing another page in her long and interesting 
history. This year marks the sixty-first anniversary of her existence 
and all her members, active or ex-active, can feel well satisfied with 
her long list of achievements. Philo is only one year younger than 
the college itself, so she may be regarded as a very vital part in 
the life of the students. 

Together with her sister and brother societies, Philo has been furnishing 
to her members that necessary literary and social training which is an out- 

:/S standing characteristic of Lebanon Valley. Her graduate members never fail 

to attribute a large degree of the success they have attained to the preparation 

['> with which Philo fitted them. The society may be extremely proud of the 

successes won by her former members; successes which would have been 

unattained had those members not participated in her varied activities while 

students at Lebanon Valley. 

■.^' 

\ ■ Today Philo is enjoying the most prosperous period in her history. Backed 

•ft> by a wealth of tradition, she is still maintaining the splendid spirit of fellow- 

■, ship which characteristically marks the attitude of all the individual 

■.\P members. Her enrollment is large, and her members are active participants 

./ ' in all the campus affairs. 

•r 

Philo is indeed fortunate in possesing the finest equipped hall on the 
''> campus, the result of the combined efforts of the graduate and active mem- 

bers. It is one of the features of which the college may well boast, and it 
is in this beautiful furnished hall where friendships are formed, never to 
be broken. 



It is not a difficult task to predict what the future holds for Philo. Her 
splendid heritage urges one to believe that there are still greater and more 
gratifying accomplishments ahead. Realizing that all her members are 
banded together in striving to attain to the best, we believe that as our college 
becomes a "Bigger and Better Lebanon Valley," so also Philo will become a 
greater Literary Society. 



Page One Hundred Thirty-fou 



(M> 



PKilok, 



osmian 



Roll 



*» 



J. Bruce Behney 
Abraham Dohner 
J. Paul Dohner 
Roy Fhnchbaugh 
Charles Gelbert 
Jacob M. Horst 
Elmer A. Keiser 
C. Milford Knisley 
Henry A. Kohler 
Uhl R. Kuhn 
Monroe H, Martin 
Samuel Meyer 
J. Millard Miller 
Harvey L. Nitrauer 
Edward Orbock 
Walter Pugh 
David H. Rank 
Byron W. Sheetz 
James D. Wallace 
Norman Wheeler 



Arnold Zwally 
John W. Beattie 
Paul W. Hunter 
Allen Klinger 
Russel C. Oyer 
Luther M. Rearick 
Harold Rider 
C. Paul Barnhart 
Francis B. Barr 
Glenn Bendigo 
Dominic Bovino 
Rudy J. Cunjack 
Clarence L. Hendricks 
G. Edgar Hertzler 
Frank S. Hoffman 
Robert Jacks 
J. Calvin Keene 
Elwood W. Meyers 
William J. Myers 
John R. Rojahn 



Albert L. Sitlinger 
Palmer M. Slenker 
E. Oscar Sneath 
John Snyder 
Oscar F. Stambaugh 
Lloyd M. Weber 
Samuel Zappia 
S. F. Christman 
Lloyd Daub 
Raphael A. Gingrich 
H. Ray Harris 
H. Howard Hoy 
Chester Johnson 
Warren E. Lebo 
Artz S. Lick 
Albert W. Miller 
Harold Watkins 
Herbert Welker 
Charles H. Wise 
Earl Wolf 



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Pag! One Hundred Thirty-five 



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Page One Hundred T hlrty-six 



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Young Men's Cnristian Association 

OFFICERS 

President J. Bruce Behney 

Vice-President Lanston Mentzer 

Secretary Henry R. Aungst 

Treasurer James C. Hazelton 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Devotional Miles S. Kiehner 

Program Arnold Zwally 

Social Millard J . Miller 

Literature Elmer A, Keiser 

Finance Roy S. Flook 

Music Russell C. Oyer 

Athletic G. Clifford Singley 

Star Coarse Walter D. Pugh 

Building Henry Y. Brubaker 

ADVISORS 
Dr. R. R. Butterwick Prof. G. A. Richie 



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Page One Hundred TImiy-c'iyhl 



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T oung Women's Cnristian Association 



OFFICERS 

President Eleanor Snoke 

Vice-President Alice Kindt 

Secretary Elsie Reider 

Treasurer Mary Geyer 

CABINET MEMBERS 

Cor. Secretary Mabel Brewbakcr 

Pianist Mildred Umholtz 

Devotional Chairman Ruby See 

World Fellowship Chairman Ruth Strubhar 

Social Chairman Emma Shaffer 

Discussion Group Chairman Madeline Rife 

Freshman Cabinet Chairman Ruth Cooper 



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Page One Hundred Thirty-nine 



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Women's Student GoA^ernment Association 

President Mary Geyer 

Vice-President Mabel Hafer 

Treasurer Sarah Lou Rose 

Secretary Jane Fearnow 

Believing that the inalienable rights of the members of our college com- 
munity can only be obtained through an organized form of government, the 
girls of Lebanon Valley College pledge their allegiance to the Women's 
Student Government Association. It is the purpose of this organization to 
inculcate right democratic ideals and to afford harmonious social relation- 
ships on the campus. 

Our government is founded on the belief that every student, upon en- 
tering college, assumes certain responsibilities. One of the most important 
of these is to regulate her conduct to conform with the highest ethical 
standards of life. It is to assist her in bearing this responsibility that our 
organization incorporates cooperation, obedience to law, honesty and good 
fellowship in its aims. For only by the formation of correct habits of 
citizenship in college today can we send from Lebanon Valley ideal citizens 
to become leaders in the world tomorrow. 



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Page One Hundred Forty 




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Men's Senate 



President G. Clifford Singley 

Vice-President Elmer A. Keiser 

Secretary-Treasurer Miles S. Kiehner 

The government of the young men of Lebanon Valley College is under 
the immediate control of the Men's Senate. The rules of the college are as 
few and simple as the proper regulation of a community of young men will 
permit. These rules, commonly termed "Major Offences" apply to all stu- 
dents of the college, an infringement upon which is punishable by recom- 
mendation to the faculty for suspension or expulsion. However, there is 
another code of laws which is chiefly applicable to the freshmen. A trans- 
gressor of these is punished according to the severity of the misdeed as 
judged by the Senate. The accused has the right to open trial and may 
offer testimony or witnesses in defense, should he desire. 

The faculty appoints one of its members as advisor to the Senate each 
year. In addition to this the faculty prevents the Senate from overstepping 
the regulations of the college. 

The organization is composed of fifteen members ; six seniors, one of which 
is elected president; five juniors; three sophomores; and one freshman. 
Aside from this governing body there are certain honors and traditions about 
the college which the entire student body cooperates to preserve. 



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Page One Hundred Forty-one 



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Ministerium 



President Byron Sheetz 

Vice-President Oscar Sneath 

Treasurer James Hazelton 

Of all the organizations on the campus which seek to develop the spiritual 
life of students, the Ministerium does most probably in enriching their 
Christian characters. This organization came into being for the express 
purpose of aiding students to experience and appreciate the wonderful power 
of prayer. Meetings are held each week at which reports of answered prayer 
are given, and requests made for united help in situations that are needful. 
The spiritual uplift the Ministerium gives to students can hardly be equalled 
elsewhere. 

In the years to come, when the lightness of college days is passed and 
when shadows o'erhang, the memories of those sweet hours of prayer will 
remain and give us grace and power to move toward the mark for the prize 
of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus, Our Lord. 



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Page One Hundred Forty-tiio 



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Student Volunteer Group 



OFFICERS 



Group Leader 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Mae Hamer 
Ruth Cooper 



The Student Volunteer Movement is distinctively a student movement in 
origin, spirit and administration. Its activities center in colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the United States and Canada. It is interdenominational 
and works in cooperation with all the Foriegn Mission Boards. 

The purpose of the movement is to challenge students to consider foriegn 
missions as a possible life work ; and to lay an equal responsibility on those 
not led or permitted to work abroad to choose their vocations in the light of 
Christ's commission and the world's needs ; to unite those students who have 
declared their purpose to become foreign missionaries for mutual helpfulness 
in preparing for their life's work; and to lay the burden of responsibility 
on all Christian students, intelligently to promote and support the missionary 
enterprise. 

The Genius of the Movement is the sharing by volunteers of a missionary 
purpose and a missionary enthusiasm with their fellow students. 



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Page One Hundred Forty-tliree 



5^:"^:=t 




Tne Writer's Club 



President John W. Beattie 

Vice-President Alice Kindt 

Secretary-Treasurer Carol Brinser 

Faculty Advisor Dr. P. A. W. Wallace 

The Writers' Club was organized in the fall of 1925 by a number of stu- 
dents for the purpose of stimulating interest in writing. The students of 
which the club is composed are attempting to test their ability in the various 
phases of literary composition such as essays, stories, and poems. Original 
compositions are read at the meetings of the club. These are criticized by 
those present, thus enabling each one to see his weaknesses. 

In each of its three years of existence, the writers' Club has sponsored 
a short story contest. It has also put over a parody contest and published 
several times (depending on the condition of the treasury) a journal known 
as "The Chat Book". Thus, although the Writers' Club may not be a 
powerful factor in the college life, it is nevertheless a positive one. 






Page One Hundred Forty-four 






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Reader's Club 



OFFICERS 

President Elmer A. Keiser 

Vice-President Mary Clymer 

Secretary Ruth Strubhar 

Treasurer Mrs. Frances Hammond 

Faculty Advisor Dr. P. A. W. Wallace 

"Clubs may come and clubs may go, but the Readers' Club — ", well, one 
can't be so presumptuous as to say "forever", but it is hoped that it will go 
on for many years. 

If it be admitted that the desire to talk is an instinct, it easily follows 
that the desire to argue, if not truly inborn, is at least, soon acquired and 
becomes a habit. Upon this assumption the Readers' Club has planned its 
programs this year. In other years discussions were hard to start — not be- 
cause there was nothing to say — but because there was no leader of the 
opposition. At the opening meeting of this school year it was decided 
to appoint a "devil's advocate" for each meeting, whose duty it would be to 
uphold the side contrary to the general opinion. The plan worked. Never 
were such debates heard in the club as are heard now. How Masefield's 
ears must have burned on that evening in which his portry was studied ! If 
there were any members present who had not read "Dauben" or "The Ever- 
lasting Mercy" they soon remedied the defect in their education ; they had to 
know what it was all about. 

No matter what other clubs may be organized at Lebanon Valley, we feel 
that the Readers' Club will never lose its place at the head of the list so long 
as its enthusiasm lasts. 



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Page One Hundred Forty-fii 



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TKe Rifle Club 

OFFICERS 

President Charles Gelbert 

Vice-President Henry Kohler 

Treasurer Luther M. Rearick 

Secretary Harvey L. Nitrauer 

Executive Officer J. Calvin Keene 

The Lebanon Valley Rifle Club was organized in the spring of 1926 under 
the auspices of the National Rifle Association of the United States Govern- 
ment. The Government, through the Army Department, furnishes free to 
each member of the club, guns, ammunition, targets and various accessories 
as they are required. 

The purpose of this club must not be misunderstood. It is not intended 
to be a military organization nor to foster militarism. Its purpose, on the 
contrary, is to "promote the sport of rifle shooting" and to develop among its 
members a love and appreciation of this sport which develops steady nerves 
and a quick eye. 

As it did last year, the club has joined a league of eight colleges. Matches 
are held weekly and the scores from each school are telegraphed to head- 
quarters which then announces the winning teams. Due to the absence of 
R. O. T. C. training, Lebanon Valley is somewhat handicapped in these 
matches but the members are receiving valuable training which they hope 
to use to good advantage in the National Championship Tournaments at 
Annapolis this Spring. 



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Page One Hundred Forly-six 




The Drum Corps 



President • • Henry Aungst 

Secretary-Treasurer John Beattie 

Lebanon Valley's infant among the organizations, the Blue and White 
Drum and Bugle Corps, made its initial appearance at the Albright football 
game, and was immediately accepted as a full fledged member of the college 
family. Since its debut, the corps has made a number of appearances at 
the pep meetings and the home games. This new group replaces the band 
of former years, and judging by its reception, it will become a permanent 
organization. The corps consists of nineteen men, which includes the drum 
major, two standard bearers, nine buglers, five snare drummers, one bass 
drummer and one cymbal beater. It is expected that the number will be in- 
creased just as soon as conditions permit, for there is considerable interest 
being displayed in the work of the musicians. 



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Page One Hundred Forty-seven 



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Lebanon Valley Intercollegiate 
Deoating Teams 

RESOLVED : Thai the system of direct primaries for state and national of- 
ficers should be abandoned. 



Affirmative Team 
Leah Harpel (Captain) 
Mary Clymer 
Miriam Muth 
Janet Miller 



Girls 

Negative Team 

Mary Ax (Captain) 

Ruth Liller 

Emma Shaffer (Manager) 
Dorothy Hiester 



Prof. M. L. Stokes 



COACHES 

Prof H. H. Shenk 



Affirmative Team 
Elmer Keiser (Captain) 
Henry Aungst 
John Snyder 
William Tetter 



Boys 



Negative Team 

Bruce Behney (Captain) 

Byron Sheetz 

James Wallace 

William Blatt 



COACHES 
Dr. P. A. W. Wallace Prof. M. L. Stokes 

Business Manager L, Archie Lutz 



€. 



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I'aqe One Hundred Forly-eighl 



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ty^UTATiVNi 



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[929 Quittapahilla Staff 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief Miles S. Kiehner 

Associate Editor Henry R. Aungst 

Art Editor John W. Beattie 

■ , A , T,^; { Kathryn V. Bork 

Associate Art Editors ' ^ .,, ^, , , 

I Orville Kunkel 

Society Editor . Mildred H. Lane 

Literary Editor Carol Brinser 

Associate Literary Editor ■ • . . Palmer Poff 

Photographic Editor Dominic Calabrese 

Feature Editor Ruth Light 

Athletic Editor Maynard P. Wilson 

conservatory Editor Ruth A. Strubhar 

College Department Editor Mae M. Hamer 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager L. Archie Lutz 

Advertising Manager Lawrence B. Derickson 

Sales Manager Wayne G. Sparrow 

The "Quittie" has always been a huge factor in the life of the student 
body o: L. V. C. It serves as a pleasant reminder of college days and activi- 
ties, and embodies all the ideals and traditions of our Alma Mater. With its 
aid, we are able to recall dear and familiar faces ; its pages hold the records 
of our own extra-curricular achievements ; and it is a priceless history of 
the happiest years of our lives. 

The staff this year has endeavored to make the 1929 "Quittie" the best 
that has ever been produced. With this goal in view, each member has 
aimed to do his utmost, working faithfully and earnestly. The able leader- 
ship and guidance of our editor-in-chief, and the hearty cooperation mani- 
fested everywhere on the campus have contributed greatly to the realization 
of the desire which is closest to the heart of every Junior — a "Quittie" worthy 
of our Alma Mater. 

The staff has experienced a great deal of pleasure in preparing the pub- 
lication of this annual, and unites in extending to the 1930 staff its hearty 
wishes for success. 



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Page One Hundred Fifty-one 



La Vie Collegienne Staff 



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REPORTERS 



General 



EDITORIAL STAFF ^' 

Editor-in-chief H. Darkes Albright 78 

. . , „ ,.^ f Anna C. Mark '28 

Associate Editors ....■■ J 

Millard J. Miller '28 



^ 



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Conservatory Mary L. Hartz '30 

Athletics G. Clifford Singley '28 

Clio Mary E. McCurdy '30 

Delphian Anna B. Apgar '30 

Kale Miles S. Kiehner '29 

Philo John W. Beattie '29 

James C. Hazleton '30 

Ruth A. Strubhar '29 ~j 

BUSINESS STAFF *7' 

Business Manager Walter D. Pugh '28 O)' 

Circulation Managei Jacob M. Horst '28 • ; 

Associate Manager L. Archie Lutz '29 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Paul A. W. Wallace Harold Bennett 

Robert R. Butterwick 

The history of college publications on our campus is a long and varied 
one. On January 1, 1888, the first edition of any sort of publication ap- 
peared, under the name, "The College Forum," This lasted until 1896, when 
the name was made "The Forum," the latter being published until 1910. The 
campus newspaper then became "The College News," but after a long and f^' 

useful service (1910-1919) it too, disappeared, and was replaced by "The . ^;' 

Crucible." "The Crucible," a sort of newspaper-magazine, proved success- tfW 

ful for several years, but 1923 heard its "Swan-Song," due to administraiive ^■ 

difficulties. 

About two years later — in the fall of 1925 — "La Vie" made its appear- 
ance, under the able leadership of "Bill" Grill and "Hen" Gingrich, and al- Cjj' 
though the road was hard and the work slow, these men laid the foundations 
for the "La Vie" we have today. In 1926 "Kelly" Ness and Wade Miller took 
up the burden, placing "La Vie" several notches uearer the standard of ex- 
cellence. 

Today, "La Vie" is not perfect — her support, especially, is weak — but 
she is "on the way." "^/ 

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Page One Hiuidred Fifty-five 




Tne Cneer Leaders 



'Red" Calabrese 
'Jack" Beattie 



"Russ" Oyer 
'Ed" Hertzler 



Backed by the crowd of Lebanon Valley rooters, each of the quartette 
of 1927-28 cheer leaders performed in a remarkable manner for the sole 
purpose of drawing from the supporters of the Blue and White teams every 
ounce of their stored up "pep" and enthusiasm. That they succeeded was 
loudly proved at the pre-game "pep" meetings, at the games, and at every 
student gathering where a supply of snap was in demand. Individual mem- 
bers of the "Jumping Jack" crew of noise dispensers had a full supply of 
it to use — and how ! 

With the unsung heroes and heroines uniting in acclaiming the struggling 
Lebanon Valley warriors, those representatives of the athletic side of the 
extra-curricular activities went into the battle with a stronger determination 
to win. 

Each of the four members of the cheer leading squad was a relic of the 
previous year, three being Juniors and one a Sophomore. Oyer, Calabrese 
and Beattie represented the third year class, while Hertzler upheld the honor 
of the Sophs. 

The student body is proud of its cheer leaders, and it is to be hoped 
that they will all return next year. 



One Hundred Fifty-si 



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TKe "L" Club 



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p 



President Paul Piersol 

Vice-President Ray Wood 

Secretary-Treasurer • Harvey Nitrauer 



WEARERS OF THE "L" 



Paul Piersol 
Charles Gelbert 
Clifford Singley 
Norman Wheeler 
Paul Elberti 
Milford Knisley 
Ray Bell 
Harvey Nitrauer 
Leland Heath 
Frederick Miller 



Maynard Wilson 
Raymond Wood 
Stanley Piela 
Roy Albright 
Glen Bendigo 
Rudy Cunjak 
Samuel Zappia 
Edgar Shroyer 
Joseph Wood 
Howard Wentz 



jAc^''^"^':^*':^.*-^-"^^^-'-^^ 



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Page One Hundred Fifty-seven 



€>] 






AtKletic Council 

FACULTY MEMBERS CJ] 

Dr. George D. Gossard President of L. V. C. f^: 

Dr. R. R. Butterwick President of Athletic Council 

Dr. Harold Bennett Prof. C. R. Gingrich 

Coach E. E. Mylin 



ALUMNI MEMBERS 

Prof. C. G. Doiter Treasurer of Alumni Council 

Ellsworth Nitraner Graduate Manager of Athletics 

Daniel Walters Paul Strickler 



:> 

Pafff One Hundred Fifly-eight 



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Pfl^f One Hundred Fifty-nine 



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FootDall Team 



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Le// £nc? Abraham, 

Left Tackle Allwein, 

Left Guard Wilson, 

Center Heath, 

Right Guard 

Right Tackle Orbock, 

Right End Dohner, 

Quarterback Russell, 

Left Half Back Albright, 

Right Half Back Daub, 

Full Back Johnson, 





Piela 




Piersol 




Wood 




Wheeler 




Elberti 




Wood 


Cunjak, 


Bendigo 




Nitrauer 


Wentz, 


Singley 


Hendricks, 


Gelbert 


Snyder, 


Zappia 



Page One Hundred Sixty 



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Football 



Coach . . 
Captain . 
Manager 



. E. E. Mylin 
CM. Gelbert 
CM. Knisley 



RECORD 



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Sept. 24 — Penn State . . . . 

Oct. 1 — Fordham 

Oct. 8— Villanova 

Oct. 15— Muhlenberg . . . 

Oct. 22— Brown 

Oct. 29— Mt. St. Mary's 

Nov, 5 — Schuylkill 

Nov. 19— Albright 



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L. 


V. 


32 


L. 


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L. 


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V. 


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Page One Hundred Sixty-one 



Football Review 1927 



I'lH the coining of the fall season, Lebanon Valley looked forward to a 
successful grid year. Fourteen letter men having returned from the 
previous season, Coach E. E. "Hooks" Mylin had a veteran team to 
work with. The running attack being built around Captain Gelbert, he 
had plenty of support from Singley, Nitrauer, Zappia, Snyder and 
Hendricks. Albright, a new Sophomore, also was a big help in the 
backfield although he was not eligible for the last two games. 

The line was also practically intact, the right tackle being the only posi- 
tion unfilled by one of the returning letter men. This problem was solved by 
shifting Ray Wood from guard to fill the hole and placing "Joe" Wood in the 
position of guard. 

A resume of the season shows two (2) victories, five (5) defeats and one 
( 1 ) tie game. Lebanon Valley lost to Penn State, Fordham, Villanova, Mount 
St. Mary's and Schuylkill. The Blue and White's greatest victory was over 
Brown University, 13-12, which was considered the greatest football upset 
since Centre defeated Harvard. The other victory was over the strong Muh- 
lenberg team, 19-0. In the final game, Albright and Lebanon Valley played 
to a 6-6 tie. Considering the fact the L. V. played all her games away from 
home and against many larger schools, the season cannot be called unsuc- 
cessful. 







Page One Hundred Sixty-t'u:o 






PENN STATE 

In Lebanon Valley's opening game with State College, the Blue and White 
made a splendid showing although they lost 27-0. The L. V. line play was the 
outstanding defensive feature, State gaining very little through the forward 
wall. Roepke's passes spelled defeat for the Mylin Men. "Charlie" Gelbert was 
the most consistent ground gainer for Lebanon Valley, making several spec- 
tacular runs on kick-offs. 

FORDHAM 

For the second game of the season, Lebanon Valley opened athletic re- 
lations with Fordham. For three periods our boys played a fine game of foot- 
ball and outplayed the larger school and it was only in the last few minutes 
of the game that Fordham was able to land two touchdowns, which gave her 
the game 13-3. L. V. lost a fine opportunity to score when she recovered 
Fordham's fumble on the four-yard line, but was unable to push it over. 
Piersol's field goal in the third period looked big until the final moments when 
Fordham's attack proved too strong for L. V. 

VILLANOVA 

Villanova was out in full force to avenge her defeat last year and accom- 
plished it by the score of 32-7. At the beginning of the game things looked 
bright for the Blue and White team, for in the first quarter, Captain Gelbert 
made a pretty fifty-two (52) yard run for a touchdown. In the remaining 
three periods, however, Villanova showed a sustained attack which accounted 



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Elberti 
Guard 



Page One Hundred Sixty-three 



for her score. In this game Ray Wood made his debut as tackle, which position 
he played for the remainder of the season. Joe Wood took his place as guard. 



MUHLENBURG 

Muhlenberg was the first victim of the Lebanon Valley team and was de- 
feated 19-0. This is the worst defeat Muhlenberg has suffered from L. V. 
in years. The Blue and White team was certainly at its best. Zappia, who 
was out of the team earlier in the season because of illness, made his first ap- 
pearance and played a splendid defensive game. Captain Gelbert and "Boob" 
Hendricks were the offensive stars. The passes of Gelbert to Hendricks ac- 
counted for the many gains that led to scores. The whole line played a re- 
markable game and kept the Muhlenberg team far from scoring distance. 



BROWN 

In the Brown game, Lebanon Valley reached the height of her football 
career. Looked upon as the underdog, she travelled to Providence and whip- 
ped the famed "Iron Men". Coming from behind to score on both occasions, 
Lebanon Valley won 13-12. After Brown had scored, Ray Wood blocked a 
punt and after a march down the field, Gelbert took the ball over. Piersol 
then kicked the extra point which proved the winning point in the game. 
After Brown had scored again in the third quarter, Lebanon Valley came back 



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Nitrauer 
Quarter Back 



Page One Hundred Sixty-four 



with that fighting spirit for which she is noted and with a strong attack which 
terminated in a long pass from Gelbert to Bendigo, Bendigo raced over the 
goal line for the winning touchdown. The whole L. V. team put up a wonder- 
ful fight against the heavier team. In this game "Charlie" Gelbert played the 
best game of his career, which should have gained for him All-American men- 
tion. Both as offensive and defensive he was the star. On the line Wheeler 
and Piersol stood out. 

MOUNT ST. MARY'S 

Mount St. Mary's afforded a big surprise when they defeated Lebanon 
Valley 6-0. Although they were outplayed during all the game, Mount St. 
Mary's broke through in the second quarter to block Gelbert's punt, his first 
blocked kick since he began to play football, and scored the only points of 
the game. L. V. could not get her running attack and the position to score 
several times lacked the necessary punch to take the ball over. However, 
the line held well on defense, for not a first down was gained through the line 
and only two were gained by the aerial route. 



SCHUYLKILL 






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The first game of the "Little Three" was played in the Schuylkill Stadium 
where Lebanon Valley was defeated 7-6. 

Schuylkill showed a powerful running attack, with Barkman running the 




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Page One Hundred Sixty-five 



end and McDonald and Knorr hitting the hne, they were able to carry the ball 
down the field to score in the last quarter. Lebanon Valley's score came as a 
result of Gelbert's run in the first period, which placed the ball inside the 
ten-yard line from which position he carried the ball over on the next play. 
In the game the L. V. line could not seem to function. Elberti was the star 
on defense, making tackle after tackle and being in nearly every play. 

ALBRIGHT 

After a week's rest, Lebanon Valley tied Albright in the last and biggest 
game of the season. While L. V. outplayed her old rival, she was forced to 
leave the game in a tie. In the first quarter. Weaver, Albright s right end, 
picked up a fumble and ran 40 yards for a touchdown. There was no more 
scoring in the first half. L. V. came back in the last half very determined, 
and after taking the ball down the field, a pass from Gelbert to Piela tied 
the score. Piersol's kick was blocked. In the final moments of the game, 
after Gelbert's long run had placed the ball within scoring distance, he passed 
the ball to Bendigo who made a fine catch but failed to take it across, mis- 
taking the 5-yard line for the goal line. The game ended before another 
play could be made. Singley played well through the whole of the game, it 
being his first participation in any game since the Brown struggle. This game 
closed the college career of the Lebanon Valley stars; Captain Gelbert, Sing- 
ley, Nitrauer, Elberti, Piersol and Wheeler. All of these men made a fine 
showing in their last game. 



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Page One Hundred Sixty-six 





Basketball 



Coach E. E. Mylin 

Captain Paul Picrsol 

Manager Raymond Koch 



L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 



RECORD 

.43 Juniata 32 

.32 Schuylkill 11 

. 22 Juniata 39 

.22 Penn State 41 

.28 Mt. St. Mary's 47 

.34 Western Maryland 38 

. 29 Georgetown 54 

.51 Susquehanna 29 

.30 Muhlenberg 39 

. 41 Dickinson 51 

.51 Albright 31 

.52 Schuylkill ■ 35 

.45 Ursinus 31 

.30 F. & M 29 

.41 Gettysburg 42 

.43 F. & M 36 

.28 Qrsinus 61 

.38 Drcxcl 27 



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Page One Hundred Sixty-seven 



TKe 1927 Season 

Lebanon Valley had quite a successful basketball season, winning 9 games 
and losing 9. The team was exceptionally good on the home floor where it 
lost one hard fought game by one point. 

For the first time in years L. V, opened her basketball season at home 
?.nd decisively beat Juniata 43-32. The next evening L. V. kept up her winning 
streak and soundly trimmed Schuylkill 32-11. Schuylkill found the basket 
only once in the last half. On a Northern trip the next week the boys' suf- 
fered two defeats, one by Juniata, 22-39 and one by Penn State, 31-22. The 
team seemed to be handicapped by the large floor at State College. 

The following week L. V. played Mt. St. Mary's and Western Maryland 
away, and lost to both of them, 28-47 and 34-38 respectively. The team then 
journeyed to Georgetown and still seemed unable to break its losing streak, 
losing by the score of 29-54. It was at home that Mylin's team finally pushed 
ahead and Susquehanna was the victim. The final score was 51-29. After 
giving this crushing defeat, L. V. lost two more hard and close games, one to 
Muhlenburg, 30-39 and the other to Dickinson, 41-51. 

After these games the Blue and White again hit the stride of which she 
is capable and won the next four games. The first of these was at the ex- 
pense of our old rival, Albright, although Albright was leading at the end of 
the first half, 16-15. Piela and Wheeler then started to score and L. V. was 
in the lead the remainder of the game. In the second half Wheeler played 
one of the best games of his college career, cutting the net four times. This 
was the last game with Albright, due to certain rules on which the two schools 
could not agree and resulted in the severing of athletic relations for the 
present. 

L. V's next guest at home was Schuylkill, who again fell, this time to the 
score of 52-35. Ursinus was the next game and was also played at home and 




Page One Hundred Sixty-eighl 



^ 



which proved another victory for Lebanon Valley, 45-31. The following night the 
team went to Lancaster and met F. & M., in an exciting game. L. V. led up 
until the last part when F. & M. started to find the basket on long shots and 
nearly took away the victory, but at the end of the game the score stood 30-29. 

The next game, Gettysburg, at home, was a hard one to lose. After a 
slow first half, both teams came back with more pep and the game proved to 
be the best one on the home floor this season. L. V. led up until the last 40 
seconds, when a foul and a field goal put Gettysburg in the lead 42-41. 
Piersol, with the man-to-man defense showed himself to be a very valuable 
asset, contributing eight points to the score. 

The Gettysburg game marked the last appearance of one of L. V's best 
all-around athletes, Charlie Gilbert, who left the following day to join the St. 
Louis Cardinals in Florida. Charlie was given one of the finest ovations by 
a student body on his appearance at the beginning of the second half. His 
last game was a "dandy" and he remains in the minds of all for his athletic 
achievements. 

The next game was also at home, the home team defeating F. & M. 43-36. 
The game was entirely "Piela" from beginning to end. The star forward had 
an "on" night and made shots from all angles. The rest of the team put up 
a fine battle, feeding the ball to him and making his shots possible. 

The last' two games were played away from home, the team winning one 
and losing one. The first game was lost to Ursinus, 61-28, making the scores 
even for the season between the two schools. The last game of the season 
was against Drexel and L. V. won 38-27 

This victory gave Lebanon Valley an even break of games in the 1927-28 
season. After the last game Piela, forward, was elected captain for the next 
season, and although losing four varsity men by graduation, next year should 
prove another successful year. 







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Page One Hundred Sixty-nine 



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Baseball 



Coach E, E, Mylin 

Captain Grant Smith 

Manager Ellsworth Nitrauer 



RECORD 



April 12 L. V. 11 

April 20 L. V. 22 

April 21 L. V. 7 

April 30 L. V. 2 

May 7 L. V. 5 

May 10 L. V. 2 

M.HY 11 L. V. 3 

May 18 L. V. 13 

May 21 L. V. 5 

May 28 L. V. 7 

May 30 L. V. 1 

June 2 L. V. 5 

June 3 L. V. 3 



Gettysburg 14 

Schuylkill 11 

Juniata 

Schuylkill 1 

West Maryland 3 

Mt. St. Mary's 3 

Georgetown 7 

Muhlenburg 6 

F. & M 3 

Susquehanna 5 

Albright 6 

Juniata 1 

Penn State 11 



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Page One Hundred Seventy 



'^J:^^'^->&r^'^''>^''^:f:^-i^''^- 



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1927 oeason 

Lebanon Valley finished a very successful baseball season, coming out on 
the long end, winning eight games and losing five. From last year's team 
were Captain Smith, "Chief" Metoxin, "Peck" Piersol, Charlie Gelbert, "Stan" 
Piela, and "Hod" Wentz who formed the foundation around which the club 
was built. The Freshman Class furnished some varsity material that greatly 
strengthened the team. A battery composed of Bendigo, catcher; Zappia and 
Hager, pitchers; with Moyer on second base and Hendricks in the outfield 
proved to be a'o.ig help. 

The team opened the season with a game with Gettysburg, losing 14-11. 
After getting off to a lead, Piela weakened, but Zappia, who took his place, 
was also hit rather hard. The following game with Schuylkill was another 
free-hitting affair, Lebanon Valley winning 22-11. The first home game was a 
victory over Juniata, 7-0. Piela pitched a fine game, shutting out the visting 
team. The second game with Schuylkill was close, Lebanon Valley being the 
victor, 2-1. The next game was played at home on May Day when Western 
Maryland fell to the score of 5-3 as a result of "Peck" Piersol's hard hitting. 



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Page One Hundred Seventy-one 






On a Southern trip Lebanon Valley dropped two close games, one to Mount 
St. Mary's 3-2 and the other to Georgetown, 4-3. 

Muhlenburg started ofl with a fine record, winning the first six games. 
However, when the Blue and White nine left the Muhlenburg diamond, it 
walked away with a 13-6 victory, thus ruining the Cardinal and Gray's chances 
for an unblemished season. 

The next two games were also Lebanon Valley victories, the victims be- 
ing Franklin & Marshall, 5-3 and Susquehanna, 7-5. The most exciting game 
of the season was against Albright. Sherid's delivery was too baffling, the 
result being a 6-1 victory for the Meyerstown nine. 

Charlie Gelbert hit a home run over the left field fence, thus saving the 
team from a shut out. Another trip up state resulted in an even break, losing 
to Penn State 11-3 and winning from Juniata 5-1. 

With the loss of only two varsity men, next year's club should prove itself 
to be another winning combination. 




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Page One Hundred Se-venty-two 



T 



ennis 



Coach Prof. Harold Bennett 

Captain ■ •■ ■ Harold Herr 

Manager Henry Ludwig 



RECORD 



;b 



Lebanon Valley 6 

Lebanon Valley 3 

Lebanon Valley 1 

Lebanon Valley 6 

Lebanon Valley 2 

Lebanon Valley 



Gettysburg 

Ursinus 1 

F. & M 5 

Albright 

Ursinus 4 

Moravian 6 



Lebanon Valley came through in fine fashion on the tennis courts, break- 
ing even in the six matches played. Losing two star players by graduation, 
the Freshman racquet wi elders had to fill in the vacancies. This they did, 
with Shroyer, Hertzler and Fink. Then with "Hen" Ludwig and "Gimpy", 
the combination was complete. Under Coach Bennett they easily beat Getts- 
burg in the opening match 6-0. Ursinus was another victim, L. V. taking the 
match 3-1. The contest against F. & M. showed the superiority of Lancaster's 
team and they emerged with the victory, 5-1. Albright, with her first tennis 
team in the inter-collegiate field, was an easy victim for L. V., the latter win- 
ning 6-0. Ursinus played at Collegeville and secured revenge on the Blue 
and White in the next match, winning 4-2. The last match of the season 
against Moravian brought defeat, 6-0. 

Prospects for next season look very bright, Herr being the only member 
lost by graduation all the others returning to school. 




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Page One Hundred Seventy-tliree 






$> 
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M. L. Stokes 
Coac/z 



Co-ed Basketball 



Coach M. L. Stokes 

Captain Emma Meyer 

Manager Janet Miller 



RECORD 



L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 



.27 Schuylkill 5 

. 45 Gettysburg 31 

.45 Gettysburg 32 

. 17 Western Maryland 15 

.45 Dickinson 30 

.13 Albright 14 

.43 Schuylkill 6 

.21 Juniata 33 

.24 Western Maryland 20 

. 26 Juniata 21 



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Janet Miller 


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Manager 




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Page One Hundred Seventy-four 



'•:'.-^'.y^-,-^.*.>Ar. •>^.'.-/" 



: ^:-^\ >^:-j&-;>Aj 



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TKe 1927-28 Season 

The 1927-28 season was one of the best in the school's history for the 
co-ed's, who won 8 out of the 10 games and lost only to Albright and Juniata. 

The girls, ably coached by Prof. Stokes, assisted by "Jim" Wallace, 
opened the season at Schuylkill and neatly trimmed them 27-5. Gettysburg 
was the next victim by the score of 45-31. The following week a return game 
was played at Gettysburg and again the L. V. co-eds were victorious, 45-32. 
The next game at Westminster, against the Western Maryland girls resulted 
in another victory, 17-15. Dickinson then fell to the score of 45-30. 

The Albright game, played at Lebanon, was the first defeat for Prof. 
Stokes' team. The use of two referees seemed to bother the girls and in the 

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Page One Hundred Seventy-fiz'e 



final seconds of the game they lost 13-14. The second game with Albright 
was not played, due to the cancelling of relations between the two schools. 
Following this game, Schuylkill came to Annville and was again defeated 
43-6. L. V.'s next and last defeat was at the hands of the Juniata girls at Hunt- 
ington. The Blue and White were without the services of Miss Lane, which 
seemed to break up the combination. They lost 21-33. The next game was at 
home where Miss Meyer and her team defeated Western Maryland again, 
this time 24-20. The last game of the season avenged the former defeat at 
the hands of Juniata, Miss Meyer leading her team to a victory of 26-21. 

The Misses Meyer and Freeman will be the only ones of the varsity lost 
by graduation. According to all indications, next year's team should be one 
hard to equal, thus enabling us to look forward with eager anticipation to 
the 1928-29 season. 



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i;-.-A:-.-Ar-^-.-flr.'.jSr 

Ptu/e One Hundred Seventy-six 



••."A'-:^'^-"s^^< 



L. V. C. 

Sing every loyal heart and true, 

For L. V. C, dear L. V. C. 
Unfurl the royal white and blue 

O'er L. V. C, dear L. V. C. 
From California's scenic glade 

To old New Hampshire's cooling shade, ijj'- 

They come, in verdant garb arrayed, ^V, 

To L. V. C, dear L. V. C. ■' 

Glad days we here together spend 

At L. V. C, dear L. V. C. '^f: 

Our friendship here shall never end Cn 

At L. V. C, dear L. V. C. \- 
None can our happy way beset 

With grim forebodings of regret; '/: 

Till life is done we'll ne'er forget q]'. 

Our L. V. C, dear L. V. C. ' ■ 

Her walls may melt beneath the flame >^- 

At L. V. C, dear L. V. C. . : 



But higher floats the honored name 

Of L. V. C, dear L. V, C. 
Fond memories shall never rust; 
Her sons shall ne'er betray her trust; 
Her learning's ways are pure and just 

At L. V. C, dear L. V, C. 



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Page One Hundred Seventy-seven 



TKe Tug 



Unequalled on land or on sea, 
That is waged by the Sophomores and Freshmen 
Just before afternoon tea. 



/■ And they try to pull each other 

^ Into the cold, wet stream. 



A banquet rewards the winners, 
In which the Class Cousins share. 

And it is for this that each team 
Is willing this peril to dare. 

Saphronia 



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If you're a dignified Senior or Junior, •.; 

Or if you're a Soph or a Frosh, *y' 

You've heard of the Quittapahilla, CJ); 

About which there is many a josh. ^'. 

Every year 'tis the scene of a battle Cj)' 

4 

Imagine a bunch of Sophomores, ■ <3J; 

Planted in holes in the sod. 
On the opposite bank are the Freshmen 

Arranged in a similar squad. 

Each end of a rope is firmly held ^4: 

i. 

By two opposing teams, |-\]' 



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When one squad has succeeded 
^ In pulling the other one in, - *^); 

They all march home together, 
The victors wearing a grin. 



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Page One Hundred Seventy-eight 



^•/^•.^r 



Student Garden 
of Verse 



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Page One Hundred Seventy-nine 



lines to tKe editor 



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well boss did it 

ever strike you how 

hard it is for me to 

turn out lines 

like these question mark 

you can't have a year book without it 

everybody wants it <Q] 

but nobody has any \- 

sympathy for you , / 

if you aren't any <Q]. 

good one minute 

you're supposed to be 

sentimental and the 

next minute you're 

supposed to be funny 

period what are you going 

to do when nothing 

comes to your head 

question mark what 

gets me is the very 

sad thought that our 

children twenty years 

from now will be reading 

this same stuff exclamation point and period 



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Pai/e One Hundred Eighty 



^JR^Is^ 



HE 

Like cold fingers need a pocket, glove or mitten, 

Like an actor or an actress needs a cue. 
Like a brindled mother tabby needs her kitten, Oj; 

I need you. 

Like the bees in clover meadows need their honey, 

Like a typist needs her pepsin gum to chew. 
Like a college fellow needs a wad of money, 

I need you. 

Like the chestnuts in the ashes need to sputter. 

Like the flowers in the garden need the dew, 
Like a pancake or a muffin needs some butter, o\' 

I need you. 



4 



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•JP SHE €J)'; 

\\y^ Like a dolphin or a sea nymph needs a garter, o). 

.'Aj Like the foot of every ladder needs a shoe, \., 

'^' Like your molars need a little coat of tartar, .7'' 

•y I need you. *3).' 

\m Like a cantaloupe or pumpkin needs a hairnet, J^'. 

'}' Like a meek and timid husband needs a shrew, 

'>_ Like Apollo or the Graces need a corset, 7." 

•.p I need you. Oj; 

."/i» Like a bachelor's convention needs the ladies, ^\ 

Jv Like a burdock or a sandbar needs some glue, .v 

'5f7 Like an ice cream plant or powder mill needs Hades, ^■ 

•jf^ I need you. cj; 

{■([> ci-. 

;J' The play raged on — "Bread! Bread! !" cried "Mooney", and the cur- T":-" 

;jf* tain came down with a Roll. <^.' 

i» I 

Page One Hundred Eiijhty-one 



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Page One Hundred Eighty-invo 



THE DISSIPATED STUDENT 



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well i had a great example 

of the corrupting influences of 

a big college brought to my eyes 

the other day period C); 

a student came into class 

and sat down on a seat 

and dozed and snored not a 

real sleep but one of those wakeful C): 

trances mumbling funny talk <•, 

to himself period he says ..7 

my name is crusty bill ^; 

i was never licked and i never will 

and then he would gaze out 
y-* the window and not listen to 

'.fr^ the prof period then he started to cry C^'. 

.•i" tell me your story i said two years _V. 

'•\. ago he said i was a handsome . .; 

'ttJ young country lad and lived ^'. 

:'f. with my parents and brothers -A'. 

. and sisters and all was merry • ■: 

■yP and innocent in that happy ^ 7' 

[fr^ pastoral life but one evil O; 

.7 ' day alas i came to lebanon ji'-, 

'•>T valley i thought i would • •; 

■.(P not ever be able ^■' 

■ ffy to get along with the rest o)'. 

•. ' one of the other fellows Vi- 

•(b 4 

■y. said to me let me . .; 

'.ff* help you along and show you ^. 

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THE DISSIPATED STUDENT 

(Continued) V 

some of the ways of the world 
i went around with him 



4} 



well what could a bashful country lad CjJ' 



4: 



like me do but finally 
i came to i learned to 
cut class every day to 
play pinochle and hang C); 



4 

4 



^ around in the pool room 

I period i started going 
to lebanon every night 

;[iS i learned the ways of z^- 

.V* a big college and believe 

'•y, me i certainly enjoy 

*.y* college now then came *-')- 

l^ our first vacation ji'- 

V and when i went back • .' 

'.'fy to the country everything ^z 

•|p seemed so innocent and q\', 

•V* the rest of the boys ' .•', 

'P ^- 

'•*. that 1 used to /; 

'P know were so insipid O; 

,'/tj so i brought them back Iji* 

.•i" and now they have become • •: 

vf7 dissipated students like myself ^,' 

•O what i teach them Cj)- 

."/L is that toujours gai i!-. 

■• ' is the word but always r / 

•.vr the gentleman and that ^Z 

'J^ its cheerio my deario Cj): 

;A^ that pulls a guy thru *X; 

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Page One Hundred Eigliiy-three 



p 



THE GHOST AND THE MONUMENT 



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'Twas the night of All Souls and some spectors 

Finding Eternity hanging heavy on their hands — 

As time does on the hands of heroes in fiction 

In half sentimental and ironical mood, 

Paid a visit to their former abode — Lebanon Valley. 

One shade sought the haunts of the Lumber Yard, 

And there among the board piles and sheds 

Where once he had borne out and lived his strenuous years 

Was a monument builded. 

"Strange," murmured the shade, "I cannot remember this statue, 

I wonder how long I've been gone? 

I wonder what stupid person in this college has been immortalized !" 

And his face rippled with a ghostly sneer. ^; 

"Statue", he said to the bronze, "What person has been uglified in you V 

So as to bring it to the comprehension of my fellow studes?" (Tj; 

And the great statue spoke, ^' 

"I am a symbol of brotherly love 

Built from the Gratitude, Respect, Admiration and Devotion 

Of the student patrons of this lumber yard. 

In honor of its most faithful couples. 

In honor of the steadiest rule breakers 

Of the college, and to the cause of matrimony in general. 

I was unveiled thirty seven years ago 

Come next Michaelmas 

With appropriate ceremonies. r^'. 

Doctor Gossard's little daughter pulled the string. 
/►^ All the faculty, several of the trustees and other notable personages were there 

\ Several of the ex-presidents spoke and altogether it was a memorable oc- ' 

7^ casion." <A;. 

■ While the statue had been telling me all these things, , f' 

/V> It seemed to me that there was something vaguely familiar ^'. 

About the general outline and character of the statue, . ; 

But the shade could not remember the face, so he spoke to the monument, tj): 

"If you were anybody at all you would 'o. 

J- Certainly remember me. I was the most ^; 

y Faithful of all those who frequented the Lumber Yard. Vv. 

■V^ I was most popular on the campus with the girls." jt!' 

,yC "Yes" said the monument, "and now let me tell you what my name is." gk. 

•.\ He gave a name and the shade 7v' 

.•/Jj Drew back in astonishment for when he heard , Oj'. 

\^ • This name he remembered it as his very own. -y" 

:K> He was the person whom his fellow <j); 

.V Studes had chosen to immortalize in *v. 

■.\f* Saylor's Lumber Yard. ^■' 

I? •! 

Piiijc One Hundred Eiglily-jour 



fr4 



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Page One Hundred Eighty-five 



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ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



Annville Printing Co 196 

Auld's Inc 193 

Bashore, J. S 197 

Blazier & Miller 192 

Bollman, K. S 191 

Chef's Place 189 

College Book Store 190 

Fink's Bakery 193 

Frantz, Daniel A 197 

Harrisburg Electrical Co 193 

Hammersmith-Kortmeyer Co 198 

Harpel, L. G 191 

Hiester Printing Co 197 

Hershey's Ice Cream Co 194 

Hub, The 190 

Ideal Restaurant, The 191 



Kinport's Dept. Store 195 

Kraemer Bros 192 

Lebanon Valley College 187 

Manufacture's Clothing Co 195 

Miller, H. W 190 

Miller Music Co 191 

Moller, M. P 193 

Pennway Restaurant, The 190 

Red Path Bureau, The 196 

Report Publishing Co 191 

Saylor, D. L 194 

Shenk, C. E 191 

Suavely, E. J 196 

Sparrow Market Co 197 

Union Emblem Co 197 

Weimer Hotel, The 191 



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Pa^e One Hundred Eighty-six 



z^^- 



'^'.^■'J- 



Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 



Two General Departments 
College and Music 

Nine Buildings Strong Faculty 

Grants A.B., B.S., B.S. in Educ, 
B.S. in Econ., and B. Mus. 



Standard College 

■p Work Accredited Everywhere 

.'A-. Lebanon Valley College is on the list of schools 

'\ accredited by "The Association of Colleges and 

.'(J3 Preparatory Schools of the Middle States and 
•^ Maryland" 



G. D. GOSSARD S. O. GRIMM 

President Registrar 



4 

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4: 



Page One Hundred Eiglity-seven 



':'^':'-^: 




"CHEF" 
''Hail To Our Chef" 



1927 Christmas Banquet Menu 

CHEF'S PLACE 



Fruit Cups 
Cream of Tomato a la Reine 



Celery 



Olives 



Roast Lebanon County Turkey 

Chestnut Stuffing Giblet Sauce 

Candied Sweets Creamed Corn 

Cranberry Sauce 

YuLETiDE Sherbet 

Waldorf Salad 

Cafe Noir Mince Pie a la Mode 

After Dinner Mints 






Page One Hundred li'ujhty-eiylit 



/^Kv 



£663 THAT YOU /^ U tT TT ' Q Jh^ BfST tS 

^ii9^./^^ V><niLr O 'Oust GOOD 



rR£SH/ 





The House of 
Good Food 

\VM. PENN HIGHWAY 
ANNVILLE 



WHILE VISITING SCHOOL 
VISIT 



CHEF'S 

Where Dad, Mother 

and Brother are 

Welcome 



A GOOD DINNER 
EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR 



i/asr Goooi 

NOUCrH 
FOfi 





NERE YOU SHOULD stop 
FOR A STEAK OR CHOP 




BELL PHONE 130 

ANNVILLE 




Page One Hundred Eighty-nine 






The Pennvvay 
Bakery and 
Restaurant 

/. L. BOWMAN, Prop. 



First Class Meals, Luncheon, 

Confectionery, Baked Products 

and Soda Fountain. 

Well Furnished Rooms 
With Running Water 

Opposite Post Office 

Annville, Pa. 



The College 
Book Store 

Harry W. Light 

The Home of — 

College Text Books, High Grade 

Stationery, Fountain Pens, 

"Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 

Art Novelties, College Seal 

Jewelry, Lawn Tennis and 

Baseball Supplies 

BOOKS and STATIONERY 

Students' Office Supplies 

43 East Main St. 

Annville, Pa. 



He who laughs last is trying to think of a dirty meaning. 

Your mirror doesn't lie, why should we? 

Children should be obscene and not heard. 

There was a young Freshman called Wigg 

Whose ego was certainly big; 

He jostled his way 

Through some sophomores one day — 

There WAS a young Freshman called Wigg. 

"I do not choose to pun" said the wise man. 



We are there in Men's Wear 

THE HUB 

713 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



H. W. Miller 

12 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

HARDWARE 

Plumbing and Heating 

Wiring and Electrical Supplies 

Riidios and Radio Supplies 

Franchise Dealer 

for 

R. C. A. and Federal Radiolas 



Oi 



Paffe One Hundred Ninety 



Compliments of 



K. S. Bollman 



Book Seller and Stationer 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Have Your College Programs 
Printed at the 

Report Publishing 
Co. 

41 N. 9th St. Lebanon, Pa. 



Stationery, Pictures and 
Kodaks and Finishin 

24- Hour Service 


Frames 

g 


Lf 


ather Goods, Lamps and 
Photographers 

HARPEL'S 


Shades 




"T/ie Gift Store of Leba 


ton" 




757-759 Cumberland 


St. 




LEBANON, PA. 





"The Students' Home" 

"The Tourists' Oasis" 

The Ideal Restaurant 

IRIIN ROEMIG, Prop. 

Pool Room and Bowling Alleys 
Two Doors Away. 

Sodas ANNVILLE, PA. Sundaes 







M.\MM.-i'S 


Advice 














"Remember, Charle 
over other people, so I 
spreds and the like.'' 


s, you are a college 
do hope you won't 


man now, you have so many advan 
fritter away too much time on mid 


tages 
night 






College 


Spirit 














Visitor: You 


have 


a wonderful college 


here. 














Freshman: 


modes 


tly) Thanks. 
















How to keep 
perfect precision, 
drops of vinegar 


the smell of an onion from your 
pepper and salt sufficiently and 
and then throw all away. 


breath 
add a 


Pee 

little 


care! 
olive 


uUy 
oil 


slice 
and a 


with 
few 



Pianos 
Victrolas 
Player Rolls 



Player Pianos 
Victor Records 
Sheet Music 



Miller's Music Store 

738 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



THE WEIMER 


LEBANON, PENNA. 


A Good Place to Eat 


A Good Place to Sleep 


PETER L. IVEIMER, Prop. 



%-^:^:^ 



Page One Hundred Ninety-one 



DHcrro GRAPHS 

n Qi^e J^orez/er 



Most tokens of Life lack life. They 
are soon faded and gone. But Photo- 
graphs are living reminders that last 
forever. Let us make your treasure 
record of Life's milestones permanent. 

BLAZIER & MILLER 

36 North Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



I say old lellow, what is the thing to give a girl for her birthday? 
The air old fellow, the air! ! 

College stud,°nt: Where's the Quitfjpahilla ? 
Dad: What are you gonna do, young fella? 
College student; There's nothing to do tonight, so I thought I'd commit suicide. 

C^o-ed's Proverb 
Better the lips be calloused than the feet. 

What any campus needs is fewer people who like to tell it what it needs. 

The three "R's" of matrimony: Romance, Rice and Rocks. 

Omar savs "Where there is method there is badness." 



Kraemer Bros. 

Furniture and Undertaking 

ANXVII.LF. 



Lebanrjn County's Busiest 
!■ urniture Store 



Eugene Hoaster 

Reliable 

INSURANCE 

All Kinds 
SURETY BOxNDS 

43 N. 8th St. Phone 1200 
Lebanon, Pa. 



4 



Page One Hundred Ninety-tivo 



♦ 



For Quality 




Baked 


Products 




of All Kinds 




e 


^ 


&/ 


V 

Patronize 


Fink's 


Bakery 


Main Street 


Annville, Pa. 



Moller Pipe Organs 

Builder of two electric organs in 
Lebanon Valley College. The 
world's largest pipe organ factory. 
Every organ specially designed for 
a particular use and fully guaran- 
teed. Whether the organ is for a 
Church, college, residence or in 
fact for any use, Aloller Organs 
lead. Booklets and specifications 
on request. 



M. P. MOLLER 

Hagerstown, Maryland 





A college p 


rofessor 


is 


a man 


w 


ho is 


paid to 


tudv 


sleep 


"S 


cond 


tions 


among 


the 


students. 
































I've gradua 


ted 


from 


H 


gh Sch 


00 


, yet 


I can't go 


to college. 














How come? 
































College doe 


n't 


open 


till 


Fall. 
























Love: The 


fee 


ing that 


makes 


a 


woman make a 


man 


make 


a i 


ool 


out of 


himself. 



AULD'S INC. 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers 

columbus, ohio 

TED LEWIS, Representative. 



'Everything Electrical" 

STROMBERG-CARLSON 
RADIOS 

Harrisburg Electric 
Supply Co. 

24 S. 2nd Street 
HARRISBURG, Penn. 



Ij 



.;fi^'^:>^:>^:>5k-.>fi<:-.'A;*>^'.'A' ■ * 



Page One Hundred Ninety-three 



'A- 



'Served JJhere The Best Is 
Usually In Request." 




ICEOtEAn 



Hershey Creamery Co. 



Harrisburg 
Chambersburg 



Lancaster 
Hagerstown 



D. L. Saylor 

& Sons 



Contractors 
and Builders 

Dealers in 

Coal and Lumber 

Both Phones ANNVILLE, PA. 



Dumb: I'm going to Ifornia next week. 
Dumber: What do your mean Ifornia? 
Dumb: The Cal is silent as in Coolidge. 

Father: That dress is entirely too short. 

Daughter: I know it, but you see. its one of mothers and she's refused to let me 
lengthen it. 

The Annville Police Force: Hey there collegian, where to with the drunken co-ed? 
Collegian: I'm taking her to a lecture. 

The Annville Police Force: \\'ho's giving a lecture at this time of the morning?. 
Collegian: Madame Green, Constable. 

First Co-ed: Did you ever walk home from a ride? 

Second Co-ed: Of course not. Do you suppose I'd let any man make a fool of me? 

She: 1 hear you neck. 

He: Sorry I'll try to be more quiet next time. 



4: 



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Page One Hundred Ninety-four 



■•^'■^■■'^■■■^■■^'■^:-^'^:-:^^^^ 



^.^:r 




For 
Merchandise of Quality 

go to 

KINPORTS 

DEPARTMENT 

STORE 

and Quality Grocer 



Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



You can ahvays 
tell a man in a 

Braeburn 

even if you can't 
tell him much 

Manufacturers 
Clothing Co. 



An optimist is one who hops out of bed in the cold mornings saying, "Well old 
bed I'll be back in seventeen hours again". 
A pessimist is one who hops in bed saying, "Gee, up in seven hours again". 

HEARD IN THE BOY'S DORM 
Look here. You're cheating. 
No I'm not. I had that ace long before we started. 

Co-ed (meeting a date at eight forty five) : So sorry to have kept you waiting. How 

long have you been here? 
Collegian: Oh that's allright I just got here myself. 
Co-ed: Oh you brute and you promised to be here at eight. 

Little Child (to Mother): What's that tramp doing with that dirty piece of paper? 
Mother: Sh, not so loud. That's a college graduate with his diploma. 

Ed.: Red tried out for yell leader. 

Co-ed: Did he go over big? 

Ed.: No he went over backwards. 

I'd rather be bright than be the president of some college. 



^iA,:^:^:^:.j5^;.^:.^-.><^:.^: a -^5.'^;^:>^.:jjft - - -.t,. 



cV 



S • fi: 



Page One Hundred Ninety-five 



c% 



The Redpath 
Bureau 

JOHN F. CHAMBERS, President 
C;E0RGE a. SLOAN, Treasurer 

643 Wabash Building 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 



Furnishes lecturers, concert com- 
panies and entertainers for all 
occasions. 

The Redpath guarantee of service 
and excellence stands as it has 
stood for over fifty \ears, back of 
ever\' attraction booked. 



Umbrellas, Trunks, Hand Luggage, 
Traveler's Requisites, Leather Goods, 
Sporting Goods, Athletic Equipment. 



E.J.SNAVELY&CO. 

Opposite Post Office 
Sth & Chestnut Sts. Lebanon, Pa. 



PRINTING 

Booklets, St/itionery^ CntaUigs. 

Folders, Eiivelof>es or anything 

you may need in this line. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing — Publishing 

Advertising 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



He necketh best and loveth best 
All women great and small ; 
But when he gets home with his wife 
He doesn't neck at all. 

EVOLUTION OF THE COLLEGE STUDENT 

First Year — Matriculate 
Second Year — Cultivate 
Third Year — Scintillate 
Fourth Year — CJraduate? ? ? ? 

The way of the transgressor is hard to keep out of. 

Sixteen drinks on the co-ed's breath, Yo-ho-ho and the dean of women! 

ONLY THE GREEN WAIT FOR THE SIGNAL 

A traffic light 
Means stop when red — 
But lips that are 
Mean "Go ahead". 






Page One Hundred Ninety-six 



5^"-^^A'A''-'^-i^'-vfi^.-:*5^-^^ 



^ •.^•.^'.•^V'^:*'^;'^':^. 




?^;-^-:^:^v^:"'^:'^; C^ 





For 


INSURANCE 




mid 


REAL 


ESTATE 




SEE 


C. E. 


SHENK 


Notary Public 


ANNVILLE, PA. 



Sparrow Market 
Co. 

SOUTH MARKET SQUARE 
HARRISBURG 

"A Bird of a Place to Deal" 



FOR 

DISTINCTIVE 

PRINTING 



HI ESTER 

Printing and Publishing Co. 

Annville, Penna. 



50 Years of Good 
Furniture 



Daniel A. Frantz 

LEBANON 



How to tell the class of a college 


man by the 


wa% 


he signs 






his name. 














Bill Smith — Freshman 














William Smith — Sophomore 












W. Algernon Smythe— 


-Junior 












W. A. Smith — Senior 














SIGN IN THE LIBRARY 






"All bags 


brief cases, candy and 


other foods 


shou 


Id be left 


outs 


de." 



J. S. BASHORE 



Clothing of Quality 



LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line Class Pins, Rings, Pennants 
and College Stationery 

Specialties in Sorority and Fraternity 
Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalogue and Prices 

Union Emblem Co. 

Valley Trust Bldg. Palmyra, Pa. 



'■':^'--^'r''^--^'-^^-^''-^-^'-^^ 



o 



Page One Hundred Nineiy-se'ven 




(a 




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Paijv One Hundred Ninety-eight 



HAMMERSMITH- 
KORTMEYER CO. 

ENGRAVERS - PRINTERS 



Get our special price on your Complete Annual 

Largest Publishers of High Quality Complete 
College Annuals in the United States 



MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 







'■"5r .^'**r"Hi=i^^^''^"'E?^ 



^^ 






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Pfl^c One Hundred Ninety-nine 



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Autog 



rapns 






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/^a^f 7"^o'o Hundred 




'^ AutograpKs 









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